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THE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology


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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2017 Sep 22

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.07845-8

Copyright © 2017 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Salivary immunoglobulin A in healthy adolescent females: effects of maximal exercise, physical activity, body composition, and diet

Hermann J. ENGELS , Bradley J. KENDALL, Mariane M. FAHLMAN, Neha P. GOTHE, Kelsey C. BOURBEAU

Division of Kinesiology, Health and Sport Studies, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA


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BACKGROUND: The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effect of acute maximal exercise (VO2max test) on salivary immunoglobulin A (SIgA) responses in adolescent females. A secondary aim was to examine the relationship between resting SIgA levels and VO2max, physical activity, body composition, and diet.
METHODS: Fifty healthy female adolescents completed a laboratory based VO2max test, assessment of body composition via hydrodensitometry, a validated physical activity questionnaire (PAQ- A), and a 3-day food diary. Unstimulated saliva was collected before, and 5-min and 120-min post VO2max testing. Absolute SIgA (μg/ml) concentration was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Secretion rate of SIgA (μg/min) was calculated by multiplying absolute SIgA concentration by saliva flow rate (SFR, μl/min).
RESULTS: A significant increase in absolute SIgA concentration (146.8±59.2 μg/ml) was noted immediately after VO2max testing (p<0.05) and returned to pre-exercise levels (120.1±54.1 μg/ml) by 120-min post-exercise (p>0.05). No significant VO2max test effects were observed for SIgA secretion rate and SFR (p>0.05). VO2max values (41.92±6.36 ml/kg/min) were correlated with body fat percentage (r= -.59; p<0.01), PAQ-A total score (r=.48; p<0.01), and acute changes in absolute SIgA levels (r=.28; p<0.05). No significant associations were observed between dietary measures and resting SIgA levels or SFR (p>0.05) except for dietary fiber which correlated with resting absolute SIgA concentration (r= .29; p<0.05).
CONCLUSIONS: Findings indicate that acute graded maximal exercise results in a transient increase in absolute SIgA concentration and that these changes are associated with individual VO2max values.


KEY WORDS: Exercise - Immunoglobulin A - Secretory - Adolescent - Cardiorespiratory fitness - Body composition

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Publication History

Article first published online: September 22, 2017
Manuscript accepted: September 13, 2017
Manuscript received: June 3, 2017

Cite this article as

Engels HJ, Kendall BJ, Fahlman MM, Gothe NP, Bourbeau KC. Salivary immunoglobulin A in healthy adolescent females: effects of maximal exercise, physical activity, body composition, and diet. J Sports Med Phys Fitness 2017 Sep 22. DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.07845-8

Corresponding author e-mail

engels@wayne.edu