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THE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology


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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2017 Sep 22

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.07639-3

Copyright © 2017 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Acute blood glucose, cardiovascular and exaggerated responses to high-intensity interval training and moderate-intensity continuous training in men with type 2 diabetes mellitus

Shohn G. WORMGOOR 1, 2, Lance C. DALLECK 3, Caryn ZINN 2, Nigel K. HARRIS 2

1 Universal College of Learning, Faculty of Health and Sciences, School of Applied Sciences and Applied Health, U-Kinetics Exercise and Wellness Clinic, Palmerston North, New Zealand; 2 Auckland University of Technology, Human Potential Centre, Auckland, New Zealand; 3 Western State Colorado University, High Altitude Exercise Physiology Program, Gunnison, CO, USA


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BACKGROUND: Optimising exercise-induced physiological responses without increasing the risk of negative exaggerated responses is an important aspect of exercise prescription for people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, knowledge of acute responses, including exaggerated responses, of different training modalities is limited.
AIM: To compare acute physiological responses of moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) and high-intensity interval training (HIIT) in T2DM.
METHODS: Baseline data were used to randomly assign male participants into supervised training groups for a 12-week intervention. During week 7, participants trialled either a fully progressed MICT (n=11) or HIIT (n=11) (combined with resistance training) session. The MICT included 26- min at 55% estimated maximum workload (eWLmax) while the HIIT included twelve 1-min bouts at 95% eWLmax interspersed with 1-min bouts at 40% eWLmax.
RESULTS: While energy expenditure and peak systolic and diastolic blood pressure responses were similar between groups (p=0.47, p=0.71, p=0.56, respectively), peak heart rate, workload and perceived exertion were higher in the HIIT group (p =0.04, p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively). Acute exaggerated responses were similar (p=0.39) for MICT (64%) and HIIT (36%) participants.
CONCLUSIONS: While structured MICT and HIIT sessions resulted in comparable acute physiological responses, the individual variations and exaggerated responses, even after preparatory training, necessitated precautionary respite in T2DM men.


KEY WORDS: Acute responses - Blood glucose - Blood pressure - Moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) - High-intensity interval training (HIIT)

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Publication History

Article first published online: September 22, 2017
Manuscript accepted: September 13, 2017
Manuscript revised: August 28, 2017
Manuscript received: April 3, 2017

Cite this article as

Wormgoor SG, Dalleck LC, Zinn C, Harris NK. Acute blood glucose, cardiovascular and exaggerated responses to high-intensity interval training and moderate-intensity continuous training in men with type 2 diabetes mellitus. J Sports Med Phys Fitness 2017 Sep 22. DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.07639-3

Corresponding author e-mail

nigel.harris@aut.ac.nz