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A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2017 Apr 28

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.07185-7

Copyright © 2017 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Comparison of physiological measures obtained using the Lode Excalibur Sport cycle ergometer and the Tacx i-Magic home training device

Kevin L., MERRY

People and Organisational Development, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK


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AIM: The aim of this study was to compare several physiological measures obtained using a criterion cycle ergometer (Lode Excalibur Sport) and a commercially available home training device (Tacx i-­Magic).
METHODS: In a randomised, counterbalanced order, eight male amateur club level cyclists (age 30.4 ± 3.5 years, body mass 75.8 ± 8.1 kg, stature 1.75 ± 0.06 m) completed a submaximal and maximal incremental test on both the Lode Excalibur Sport and the Tacx i-Magic.
RESULTS: Data from the submaximal incremental test revealed that HR was significantly greater during the Lode trials at power outputs of 250 W (P = 0.003), 280 W (P < 0.001) and 310 W (P < 0.001). VVO2 was significantly greater during the Lode trials at 310 W (P = 0.001) and BLa was significantly greater during the Lode trials at 310 W (P = 0.004). RER was significantly greater during the Lode trials at 310 W (P < 0.001). The power output corresponding to the lactate threshold (POLT) was not significantly different between the ergometers (P > 0.05). The power output corresponding to a blood lactate concentration of 4 mmol.L­1 (PO4), was significantly greater (P = 0.003) during the Tacx trials. VVO2max was not different between the ergometers (P >0.05), however, the power output associated with VVO2max (POVVO2max) (P = 0.02), and peak power output (PPO) (P = 0.006), were significantly different.
CONCLUSIONS: Cyclists should exercise caution when transferring laboratory based physiological measures to the Tacx i-­Magic during exercise > 250 W.


KEY WORDS: Cycling - Ergometer - Power output - Training

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Cite this article as

Kevin L. Comparison of physiological measures obtained using the Lode Excalibur Sport cycle ergometer and the Tacx i-Magic home training device. J Sports Med Phys Fitness 2017 Apr 28. DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.07185-7 

Corresponding author e-mail

kevin.merry@dmu.ac.uk