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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2020 June;60(6):823-31

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.20.10327-X

Copyright © 2020 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Effects of different multicomponent training methods on functional parameters in physically-active older women

Leandro H. BRANDÃO 1 , Antônio G. RESENDE-NETO 1, Iohanna G. FERNANDES 1, Alan B. VASCONCELOS 2, Albernon C. NOGUEIRA 1, Marzo E. DA SILVA-GRIGOLETTO 1, 2

1 Postgraduate Program of Physical Education, Federal University of Sergipe, São Cristovão, Brazil; 2 Postgraduate Program of Physiology, Federal University of Sergipe, São Cristovão, Brazil



BACKGROUND: Negative functionality changes are among the effects of aging. The multicomponent training performed on conventional machines or with new implements and features directed to daily activities is strongly recommended among attenuation strategies. However, the efficiency of both types of training is not yet clear in the recent literature. The aim was to compare the effects of different multicomponent training methods on functional parameters in older women.
METHODS: Thirty-seven volunteers were randomly selected into the functional multicomponent training (MFT: N.=15), traditional multicomponent training (MTT: N.=14) and control group (CG: N.=8). They were assessed in the tests: Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT), Ten-Minute Fast Walking Test (10FWT), Timed Up and Go test (TUG), Functional Reach Test (FRT), Ankle Test (AKT), Sit To Stand Modified test (STSM), and quality of life (QOL). ANOVA (3×2) followed by the Bonferroni post-hoc was used, adopting P≤0.05 for statistical significance.
RESULTS: When compared pre-post values, MFT showed significant differences in all functional tests evaluated (AKT: P<0.01; STSM: P<0.01; FRT: P<0.01; QOF: P<0.01; 10FWT: P<0.01; 6MWT: P<0.01; TUG: P<0.05). In the same comparison, MTT showed a significant change in all tests (AKT: P<0.01; STSM: P<0.01; FRT: P<0.01; QOF: P<0.05; 6MWT: P≤0.05; TUG: P<0.05) except 10FWT. When compared to CG, MFT showed a significant difference in all walking tests and MTT showed a better performance in 10FWT and TUG.
CONCLUSIONS: Both experimental protocols were effective to improve functional parameters in older women. However, the MFT was performed better in most tests that required efficiency in gait ability.


KEY WORDS: Gait; Healthy aging; Women; Resistance training

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