Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2020 May;60(5) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2020 May;60(5):685-92

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2020 May;60(5):685-92

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.20.10446-8

Copyright © 2020 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Effects of a 4-month judo program on gait performance in older adults

Simone CIACCIONI 1, Laura CAPRANICA 1, Roberta FORTE 1, Caterina PESCE 1, Giancarlo CONDELLO 2

1 Department of Movement, Human and Health Sciences, University of Rome Foro Italico, Rome, Italy; 2 Graduate Institute of Sports Training, Institute of Sports Sciences, University of Taipei, Taipei, Taiwan



BACKGROUND: Falls prevention is a critical goal of training program for older individuals. This study explored the effects of a judo program on gait performance in older adults.
METHODS: Pre- and post-intervention (15 weeks, 1-hr session, twice a week) step length (cm), gait cycle time (s), speed (m·s-1) and cadence (step·min-1) mean values (AVG) and coefficients of variation (CV) were assessed in a judo (JG: N.=16 novice judoka; age=69.3±3.9 years) and a control (CG: N.=14 healthy older adults; age=70.1±4.5 years) group. Two 3 (motor complexity: flat, corridor, hurdling) ×2 (group: JG, CG) ×2 (time: pre, post) MANOVAs with repeated measures were applied to ascertain differences in gait parameters.
RESULTS: A significant Time×Motor Complexity×Group interaction was found for AVG and CV. For AVG, JG showed improvements for flat and hurdling conditions in step length (flat: ∆=+2.6%, d=0.4; hurdling: ∆=+3.2%, d=0.4), gait cycle (flat: ∆=-4.3%, d=0.4; hurdling: ∆=-4.0%, d=0.5), speed (flat: ∆=+6.6%, d=0.7; hurdling: ∆=+6.7%, d=0.6) and cadence (flat: ∆=4.3%, d=0.4; hurdling: ∆=3.9%, d=0.5). For CV, JG improved step length for flat (∆=-20.9%, d=0.6) and hurdling (∆=-16.3%, d=0.8) conditions, whereas CG showed a deterioration in the step length for the corridor condition (∆=+22.3%, d=0.7).
CONCLUSIONS: The findings demonstrated the effectiveness of an adapted judo program for improving gait performance in older individuals, suggesting a potential protective effect for fall risk.


KEY WORDS: Gait analysis; Martial arts; Elderly; Health; Walking speed

top of page