Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2020 March;60(3) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2020 March;60(3):388-94

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe PROMO
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Cite this article as

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2020 March;60(3):388-94

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.19.10222-8

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Effects of heel height with backpack loading in young people

Serap ALSANCAK, Senem GÜNER , Enver GÜVEN, Ali K. ÖZGÜN

Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Faculty of Health Science, Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey



BACKGROUND: There are many intrinsic and extrinsic factors that could affect posture. Two of them are backpack and heel height. The aim of this study is to investigate the immediate static effects on cervical and lumbosacral postural changes to determine the effects of heel and forefoot heights with backpack loading on both vertebral curves and posture.
METHODS: Craniovertebral (CVA), pelvic tilt (APT), and ankle joint motion angles were measured from sagittal photographs of 20 university students in a static posture while carrying backpacks. The same measurements were taken and recorded conventional shoes with heel and forefoot heights. Postural analysis software (PAS/SAPO) was used to conduct angle assessments of the photos.
RESULTS: Postural angles of the vertebral column on the cervical and lumbosacral regions are changed immediately up to the posterior thoracic load with backpacks in young people. CVA was an average of 52° only shoes and no load condition, while the angle was reduced to 49° with loading. In contrast, an increasing angle with additional heel height and zero heel height in conventional shoes were reported. CVA increased with heights to 53° for the heel and 55° at the forefoot. The average APT angle was 14° only shoes and no load condition, and this angle increased to 18.9° with the 20% BW load. Accordingly for the no load and load conditions, the significant increase in the APT angle was 21° with the 20% BW load with heel height and 23° for the 20% BW load along with forefoot height. The heights provided negative effects on the vertebral posture and ankle angle.
CONCLUSIONS: The results of the study indicate that it may not be advisable for young people to wear shoes with high heels and negative heel height by taking into account the risk factors in the body and ankle postural compensation while carrying a backpack.


KEY WORDS: Weight-bearing; Posture; Shoes

top of page