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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EPIDEMIOLOGY AND CLINICAL MEDICINE 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2019 December;59(12):2053-7

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.19.09794-9

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Protein supplement use and prevalence of microalbuminuria in gym members

Héctor PARRA-LOMELÍ 1, Benjamín TRUJILLO-HERNÁNDEZ 1, Francisco ESPINOZA-GÓMEZ 1, Paulina VARGAS-AGUIRRE 1, Abraham OROZCO-MARTINEZ 2, Alicia M. NEGRETE-CRUZ 2, José GUZMÁN-ESQUIVEL 2 , Iván DELGADO-ENCISO 1

1 School of Medicine, Universidad de Colima, Colima, Mexico; 2 Unit of Clinical Epidemiologic Research, Zone 1 General Hospital, Mexican Social Security Institute, Colima, Mexico



BACKGROUND: Protein supplement use is common in bodybuilders because protein supplements are thought to increase muscle mass by preventing protein catabolism during exercise routines. Information on the consequences of protein supplement use is scarce and contradictory. Therefore, the identification of a kidney damage marker, such as microalbuminuria, could be transcendent in preventing probable organ compromise in healthy persons. The aim of this study is to determine the presence of microalbuminuria in gym members and whether there is an associated risk with protein supplement use.
METHODS: An analytic, descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted. It included gym members whose clinical and nutritional histories were taken, identifying protein supplement use. Microalbuminuria was then determined through a random urine sample. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for the data analysis. The objective was to determine the presence of microalbuminuria in gym members and whether there is an associated risk with protein supplement use.
RESULTS: A total of 107 gym members, 71 men and 36 women, that met the inclusion criteria of the study were analyzed. Their mean age was 35±13 years, and the prevalence of microalbuminuria was 9.34%. There was active protein supplement use in 58% of the study participants, with a mean consumption duration of 16±22 months. No association with the presence of microalbuminuria was found (P=0.35).
CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of microalbuminuria in gym members was higher than that of the general healthy population and was not associated with protein supplement use.


KEY WORDS: Albuminuria; Dietary supplements; Physical fitness; Gymnastics

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