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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2019 November;59(11):1845-51

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.19.09504-5

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Ten-second maximal pedaling power as a representative measure for assessing sprint performance

Takaya YOSHIMOTO 1 , Yohei TAKAI 2, Hiroyasu TSUCHIE 3, Yoshihiro CHIBA 4, Ryo MOTOSHIO 5, Hiroaki KANEHISA 2

1 Japan Institute of Sports Sciences, Tokyo, Japan; 2 National Institute of Fitness and Sports in Kanoya, Kagoshima, Japan; 3 Toyo University, Tokyo, Japan; 4 Josai University, Sakado, Japan; 5 Fujitsu Human Resource Professionals, Ltd., Kawasaki, Japan



BACKGROUND: There is no evidences concerning the relative contribution of physiological parameters to maximal sprinting velocity and acceleration ability. The aim of this study is to elucidate the associations between physiological variables and sprint performance.
METHODS: Twenty-six male sprinters performed a 60-m sprint twice. Maximal sprint velocity (Vmax) and running distance after 4 s from the start (D4) were measured as indices of sprint performance during the sprint using a laser distance measurement device. Body composition, jump performance in the countermovement jump, the rebound jump, the standing long jump and the standing 5-step jump, and 10-s maximal anaerobic pedaling power were measured as physiological variables.
RESULTS: All measured variables were significantly related to Vmax (r=0.49-0.71, P<0.05) and D4 (r=0.39-0.72, P<0.05), expect for anthropometric variables. Multiple regression analysis indicated that the 10-s maximal anaerobic pedaling power relative to body mass was the only variable that significantly explained Vmax and D4.
CONCLUSIONS: The 10-s maximal anaerobic pedaling power relative to body mass can be a representative measure for assessing the sprint performance of male sprinters.


KEY WORDS: Acceleration; Running; Athletic performance

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