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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2019 November;59(11):1812-9

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.19.09433-7

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

The influence of playing position in soccer on the recovery kinetics of cognitive and physical performance

Mathieu NEDELEC 1 , Gregory DUPONT 1, 2, 3

1 French Institute of Sport (INSEP), Research Department, Laboratory Sport, Expertise and Performance (EA 7370), Paris, France; 2 Federation Française de Football, Paris, France; 3 The Football Exchange, Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK



BACKGROUND: The physical activity and playing actions performed during a soccer match vary according to player position. The aim of the present study was to analyze the recovery kinetics of cognitive performance, physical performance and subjective ratings after a competitive soccer match.
METHODS: Eight goalkeepers and eight outfield players played in the match with data collected before, 45 min, 24 h and 48 h after the match. Subjective ratings, Vienna Reaction Test (reaction time, motor time), Vienna Determination Test (number of stimuli, number of correct responses), squat jump, countermovement jump and 6-s sprint were analyzed.
RESULTS: No significant interaction between position and time was found for Vienna Reaction Test and Vienna Determination Test performance. No significant interaction between position and time was found for squat jump and countermovement jump but squat jump and countermovement jump significantly decreased (P<0.01) at 24 h. Countermovement jump performance was still significantly affected at 48h (P<0.05). A significant interaction between position and time (P<0.05) was found for 6-s sprint. Sprint performance was significantly reduced for outfield players only immediately after the match (P<0.01). There was no interaction effect of position and time on subjective ratings. A significant correlation was found between number of jumps and ball kicks performed during the match by goalkeepers and the change score in squat jump (r =-0.90; P<0.01) and countermovement jump (r =-0.90; P<0.01) observed at 48 h.
CONCLUSIONS: Outfield players require a longer time than goalkeepers to recover sprint performance whilst cognitive function tested in the present study is not affected by the match whatever the position.


KEY WORDS: Football; Fatigue; Myalgia

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