Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2019 October;59(10) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2019 October;59(10):1651-8

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2019 October;59(10):1651-8

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.19.09770-6

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Validity and reliability of Gyko Sport for the measurement of barbell velocity on the bench-press exercise

Jorge AREDE 1 , Bruno FIGUEIRA 1, 2, Oliver GONZALO-SKOK 3, Nuno LEITE 1

1 Research Center in Sports Sciences, Health Sciences and Human Development (CIDESD), University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Vila Real, Portugal; 2 Faculty of Sport Biomedicine, Lithuanian Sports University, Kaunas, Lithuania; 3 Faculty of Health Sciences, University of San Jorge, Zaragoza, Spain



BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to examine the validity and reliability of the novel inertial measurement unit (named: Gyko Sport) for the measurement of barbell concentric velocity on the bench-press exercise.
METHODS: Ten under-16 (U16) basketball players performed 2 repetitions of the bench press exercise with 6 different loads (40, 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90% of one repetition maximum [1-RM]; N.=120 repetitions). Mean velocity for each repetition was simultaneously recorded using the Gyko Sport and SmartCoach linear transducer.
RESULTS: Results showed a very large correlation between the SmartCoach and Gyko Sport (r=0.79; standard error of estimate [SEE]=0.18 m/s). Furthermore, there was a very high agreement between both devices for the measurement of the mean velocity (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]=0.774; Cronbach’s alpha [α]=0.872; Bland-Altman Plots [R2]=0.070). The Gyko Sport registered similar, but slightly higher values than the SmartCoach (P=0.103; mean difference 0.075±0.05 m/s).
CONCLUSIONS: The results support the use of the Gyko Sport as an affordable, portable, and suitable wearable device to measure mean velocity on bench press exercise.


KEY WORDS: Physiologic monitoring; Exercise test; Muscle strength; Resistance training; Technology

top of page