Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2019 July;59(7) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2019 July;59(7):1195-9

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE  BODY COMPOSITION, NUTRITION AND SUPPLEMENTATION 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2019 July;59(7):1195-9

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.16.05156-2

Copyright © 2014 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

The relationship between shin splints with anthropometric characteristics and some indicators of body composition

Vajiheh SABETI 1, Nahid KHOSHRAFTAR YAZDI 2 , Nahid BIJEH 2

1 Department of Physical Education, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran; 2 Faculty of Sport Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran



BACKGROUND: Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), commonly known as “shin splints,” is a frequent injury of the lower extremity and one of the most common causes of exertional leg pain in athletes. The aim of this study was to study the relationship between Shin splints, anthropometric characteristics and some indicators of body composition.
METHODS: In this descriptive-comparative study, 35 students of physical education were evaluated in two groups: Shin Splints group ([N.=17], mean [±SD] height and weight, 161.52±5.32 and 56.85±9.30 respectively) and healthy group ([N.=18], mean [±SD] height and weight, 162.75±3.85 and 54.73±6.36 respectively). Anthropometric and body composition characteristic of both groups were studied under identical conditions. Independent t-test was performed in order to analyze the data.
RESULTS: No significant differences were found in anthropometric parameters (thigh length, leg length, foot length and leg circumference) body composition (the amount of minerals and body fat percentage) between the healthy group and the Shin Splints group (P>0.05).
CONCLUSIONS: According to the results of this study, anthropometric characteristics and body composition indicators may not be regarded as a risk factor for shin splints.


KEY WORDS: Anthropometry; Body composition; Medial tibial stress syndrome

top of page