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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2019 July;59(7):1162-7

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.18.09205-8

Copyright © 2018 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Gait parameters in physically active and inactive elderly as well as young community-living people

Éva KOVÁCS 1 , András SIMON 2, Anna N. PETRIDISZ 1, Réka L. ERDŐS 1, Franciska ROZS 1, Anikó VIRÁG 2, 3

1 Department of Morphology and Physiology, Institute of Basic Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Semmelweis, Budapest, Hungary; 2 Department of Physiotherapy, Institute of Applied Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Semmelweis, Budapest, Hungary; 3 Private practitioner, Budapest, Hungary



BACKGROUND: This study aimed to reveal the effects of a complex exercise program on gait among older people through analyzing the gait parameters in three groups: 1) older individuals participating in complex exercise program called 60+; 2) older individuals who were physically inactive; and 3) young individuals.
METHODS: Fifty-seven community-living individuals were enrolled in this study. Variability of step length, step time, step width, and double support ratio as well as automaticity were measured.
RESULTS: We found that the variability of step length, step time, and double support ratio, as well as the cognitive automaticity index of physically inactive elderly individuals were significantly worse compared to both physically active elderly (step length P=0.007; step time P=0.002; double support ratio P=0.036; cognitive automaticity index P=0.006) and young individuals (step length P<0.001; step time P<0.001; double support ratio P=0.001; cognitive automaticity index P=0.003). However, the variability of gait step width did not differ among the three groups.
CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that 60+ program has beneficial effects on gait parameters. Thus, the 60+ program can enrich the range of geriatric exercise programs aiming to improve gait safety.


KEY WORDS: Gait; Exercise; Walking; Aged

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