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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2019 April;59(4):575-80

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.18.08359-7

Copyright © 2018 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Impact kinetics associated with four common bilateral plyometric exercises

Ethan STEWART 1 , Thomas KERNOZEK 2, Hsien-Te PENG 3, Brian WALLACE 4

1 Department of Kinesiology, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, USA; 2 Department of Health Professions, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, La Crosse, WI, USA; 3 Department of Physical Education, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan; 4 Department of Kinesiology, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, Oshkosh, WI, USA



BACKGROUND: This study quantified the peak vertical ground reaction force (VGRF), impulse, and average and instantaneous loading rates developed during bilateral plyometric exercises.
METHODS: Fourteen collegiate male athletes performed 4 different bilateral plyometric exercises within a single testing session. Depth jumps from thirty, 60 and 90 centimeter heights (DJ30, DJ60, and DJ90, respectively), and a 2 consecutive jump exercise (2CJ), were randomly performed. The subjects landed on and propelled themselves off two force platforms embedded into the floor. The stance phase of each plyometric movement was analyzed for vertical force characteristics. The dependent variables were normalized to body weight. One-way repeated-measures ANOVA revealed significant differences between exercises (P≤0.05).
RESULTS: For VGRF, only the DJ60 and 2CJ exercises were not different from each other. The impulses between DJ60 and DJ90, and DJ30 and 2CJ, were not different. All exercises were different from each other in regards to average and instantaneous loading rate except for DJ30 vs. DJ60, and DJ90 vs. 2CJ. The DJ90 condition reported the highest peak VGRF by approaching five times body weight. The 2CJ condition had similar impulse and loading rates as the DJ90 condition.
CONCLUSIONS: A proper progression and detailed program planning should be utilized when implementing plyometric exercises due to their different impact kinetics and how they might influence the body upon ground contact.


KEY WORDS: Exercise - Physical fitness - Athletic injuries - Exercise movement techniques

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