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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2019 February;59(2):210-6

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.18.08290-7

Copyright © 2018 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

The acute effects of stretching with vibration on dynamic flexibility in young female gymnasts

A. Wayne JOHNSON 1 , Caisa N. WARCUP 1, Matthew K. SEELEY 1, Dennis EGGETT 2, J. Brent FELAND 1

1 Department of Exercise Sciences, College of Life Sciences, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, USA; 2 Department of Statistics, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, USA



BACKGROUND. While stretching with vibration has been shown to improve static flexibility; the effect of stretching with vibration on dynamic flexibility is not well known. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of stretching with vibration on acute dynamic flexibility and jump height in novice and advanced competitive female gymnasts during a split jump.
METHODS: Female gymnast (N.=27, age: 11.5±1.7 years, Junior Olympic levels 5-10) participated in this cross-over study. Dynamic flexibility during gymnastic split jumps were video recorded and analyzed with Dartfish software. All participants completed both randomized stretching protocols with either the vibration platform turned on (VIB) (frequency of 30 Hz and 2 mm amplitude) or off (NoVIB) separated by 48 h. Participants performed 4 sets of three stretches on the vibration platform. Each stretch was held for 30 seconds with 5 seconds rest for a total of 7 minutes of stretch.
RESULTS: Split jump flexibility decreased significantly from pre to post measurement in both VIB (-5.8±5.9°) (P<0.001) and NoVIB (-2.6±6.1°) (P=0.041) conditions (adjusted for gymnast level). This effect was greatest in lower skill level gymnasts (P=0.003), while the highest skill level gymnasts showed no significant decrease in the split jump (P=0.105). Jump height was not significantly different between conditions (P=0.892) or within groups (P=0.880).
CONCLUSIONS: An acute session of static stretching with or without vibration immediately before performance does not alter jump height. Stretching with vibration immediately prior to gymnastics competition decreases split jump flexibility in lower level gymnasts more than upper level gymnasts.


KEY WORDS: Warm-up exercise - Gymnastics - Athletic performance - Muscle stretching exercises

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