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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  BODY COMPOSITION, NUTRITION AND SUPPLEMENTATION 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2018 November;58(11):1657-65

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.07999-3

Copyright © 2017 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Anthropometric profile of combat athletes via multivariate analysis

Anna BURDUKIEWICZ , Jadwiga PIETRASZEWSKA, Aleksandra STACHOŃ, Justyna ANDRZEJEWSKA

Department of Physical Anthropology, University School of Physical Education in Wroclaw, Wroclaw, Poland



BACKGROUND: Athletic success is a complex phenotype influenced by multiple factors, from sport-specific skills to anthropometric characteristics. Considering the latter, the literature has repeatedly indicated that athletes possess distinct physical characteristics depending on the practiced discipline. The aim of the present study was to apply univariate and multivariate methods to assess a wide range of morphometric and somatotypic characteristics in male combat athletes.
METHODS: Biometric data were obtained from 206 male university-level practitioners of judo, jiu-jitsu, karate, kickboxing, taekwondo, and wrestling. Measures included height- and length-based variables, breadths, circumferences, and skinfolds. Body proportions and somatotype, using Sheldon’s method of somatotopy as modified by Heath and Carter, were then determined. Body fat percentage was assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis using tetrapolar hand-to-foot electrodes. Data were subjected to a wide array of statistical analysis.
RESULTS: The results show between-group differences in the magnitudes of the analyzed characteristics. While mesomorphy was the dominant component of each group somatotype, enhanced ectomorphy was observed in those disciplines that require a high level of agility. Principal component analysis reduced the multivariate dimensionality of the data to three components (characterizing body size, height-based measures, and the anthropometric structure of the upper extremities) that explained the majority of data variance.
CONCLUSIONS: The development of a sport-specific anthropometric profile via height- and mass-based and morphometric and somatotypic variables can aid in the design of training protocols and the identification of athlete markers as well as serve as a diagnostic criterion in predicting combat athlete performance.


KEY WORDS: Kinanthropometry - Martial arts - Male - Principal components analysis

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