Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2018 September;58(9) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2018 September;58(9):1247-52

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2018 September;58(9):1247-52

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.06849-9

Copyright © 2017 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Effect of shoulder position on triceps brachii heads activity in dumbbell elbow extension exercises

Daniel ALVES 1 , Thiago MATTA 2, 3, Liliam OLIVEIRA 2, 3

1 Physical Education Center Admiral Adalberto Nunes, Brazilian Navy, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 2 Biomedical Engineering Program, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 3 Physical Education and Sports School, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil


PDF


BACKGROUND: Elbow extension exercises in different shoulder positions are selected to raise distinct effort levels among the triceps brachii heads. Because there are several triceps exercises, its choice is a big challenge on resistance training prescription. The present study aimed to compare the electromyographic signal of triceps brachii long and lateral heads among three different elbow ranges of motion (ROM) during two commonly prescribed elbow extension exercises: overhead dumbbell elbow extension (OD) and lying dumbbell elbow extension (LD).
METHODS: The long and lateral heads electromyographic signals were acquired from 21 resistance-trained men. One to two maximal repetitions of each exercise was performed with a 40% load of a maximal voluntary isometric contraction test. The signals of concentric and eccentric phases were divided into three equal ROMs each (initial, middle, and final).
RESULTS: Eccentric phase elicited less muscular activity than concentric in both exercises. Concentric contraction presented the same pattern during OD (long and lateral heads) and LD (lateral head). Initial and middle intervals elicited higher muscle activity than final interval. This behavior was also present in the eccentric contraction (initial demanded less activity than middle and final during both exercises).
CONCLUSIONS: Since both exercises presented similar activation patterns, the prescription of OD and LD on the same training routine should be avoided.


KEY WORDS: Electromyography - Resistance training - Skeletal muscle - Elbow - Shoulder

top of page