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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EPIDEMIOLOGY AND CLINICAL MEDICINE 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2018 July-August;58(7-8):1110-5

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.07666-6

Copyright © 2017 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Effect of martial arts training on IL-6 and other immunological parameters among Trinidadian subjects

Geeta KURHADE 1 , B. Shivananda NAYAK 1, Arvind KURHADE 2, Chandrasekhar UNAKAL 2, Krutika KURHADE 3

1 Department of Preclinical Sciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad; 2 Department of Paraclinical Sciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad; 3 JNMC and Vinoba Bhave Rural Hospital, Sawangi Meghe, Wardha, India


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BACKGROUND: Persistent bouts of extended exercise and heavy training are associated with depressed immune cell function. It has recently been demonstrated that interleukin-6 (IL-6) is produced locally in contracting skeletal muscles and acts on a wide range of tissues. Larger amounts of IL-6 are produced in response to exercise than any other cytokines. Though the majority of existing data obtained following prolonged exercise, it remains to be explained the effect of martial arts training on IL-6 and other immunological parameters and associated changes to the duration of this type of exercise. IL-1α is produced mainly by activated macrophages, as well as neutrophils, epithelial cells, and endothelial cells. It possesses metabolic, physiological, hematopoietic activities, and plays one of the central roles in the regulation of the immune responses. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of martial arts training on IL-6 and other immunological parameters among Trinidadian subjects.
METHODS: Sixteen healthy, non-smoker individuals who have been martial arts practitioners for the last 5-15 years, aged 25.94±7.6.20 years. Blood samples were collected to determine IL-6 and other immunological parameters at pre-exercise, immediately post exercise (0 hours), 1 hour, 2 hour and 52 hours of post exercise). IL-6 and IL-1 was measured using Human IL-6 and IL-1 β ELISA kit, blood cell count was done using automated blood cell counter and CD4, and CD3 count was performed using the automated immunofluorescence analysis by flow cytometer.
RESULTS: The mean basal IL-6 level was 71.47±4.3 and reduced to 70.1±21.6 immediately after exercise and then increased to 75.70±8.2 after one hour of exercise bout, returning to basal level after two hours and remained so after 52 hours. The CD4 count was decreased as low as 102.2, (much lower than immune-compromised subjects) after the bout of training but returned to normal range within 2 hours of exercise and increased even more after 52 hours. Similar trends have been observed for hematological parameters such as white blood cells, granulocytes and lymphocytes. The white blood cell count, granulocyte count and lymphocyte count increased immediately after exercise and returned to basal level only after 52 hours of exercise.
CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights that the martial arts exercise increases key cytokines and other hematological parameters. The magnitude of the martial arts exercise-induced IL-6 response is dependent on intensity and especially duration of the exercise.


KEY WORDS: Interleukin-6 - Immunologic monitoring - Martial arts

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