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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2018 July-August;58(7-8):974-9

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.07022-0

Copyright © 2017 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Acute ingestion of neuromuscular enhancement supplements do not improve power output, work capacity, and cognition

Jennifer A. BUNN 1 , Andrew CROSSLEY 2, Morgan D. TIMINEY 1

1 Department of Physical Therapy, Campbell University, Buies Creek, NC, USA; 2 Athletics - Strength and Conditioning, High Point University, High Point, NC, USA


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BACKGROUND: Improving motor unit recruitment and function is trainable and positively affects performance. Evidence suggests that supplementation of choline, uridine, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may also enhance neuromuscular function. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of acute ingestion of these supplements on anaerobic exercise performance and cognition.
METHODS: Twenty college-aged trained males (21.2±1.4 years, 181.2±6.1 cm, 94.4±20.5 kg, and 15.9±6.6% body fat) received the supplements (SUPP: 500 mg alpha glycerophosphocholine [AGPC], 250 mg uridine-5’-monophosphate, and 1500 mg DHA) or a placebo (PLA) in a randomized cross-over study design. All participants completed one familiarization and two experimental testing sessions, consisting of a warm up, vertical jump assessment, 61-kg bench press rep max, and completion of the ImPACT neural cognition test. In the two testing sessions, participants received, in random order, either the SUPP or a PLA, 90 minutes before testing.
RESULTS: There was no significant difference between SUPP and PLA on exercise performance or neural cognition (P>0.05).
CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study indicated no benefit from acute ingestion of a DHA, uridine, and choline supplement versus a placebo on anaerobic performance or cognition. It is likely that acute ingestion of these supplements did not provide the necessary elements to increase acetylcholine concentration or number of dendritic spines, rather ingestion for a longer time period and subsequent days may provide a benefit.


KEY WORDS: Uridine - Choline - Docosahexaenoic acids

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