Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2018 April;58(4) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2018 April;58(4):428-34

CURRENT ISSUE
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Cite this article as

THE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology


Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,215


eTOC

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS


The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2018 April;58(4):428-34

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.06655-5

Copyright © 2017 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

The effect of high speed strength training with heavy and low workloads on neuromuscular function and maximal concentric quadriceps strength

Ali A. MAZANI 1, Mohamed R. HAMEDINIA 1, Amir H. HAGHIGHI 1, Nosratollah HEDAYATPOUR 2

1 Faculty of Sport Science, Hakim Sabzevari University, Sabzevar, Iran; 2 Center for Biomechanic and Motor Control (BMC), Department of Sport Science, University of Bojnord, Bojnord, Iran


PDF  


BACKGROUND: Dynamic strength training has been widely used to increase the ability of skeletal muscle to produce muscle force. Manipulating resistance training program variables has been commonly used as a tool to optimize maximum strength. This study examined the effects of 12 weeks of high-speed strength training with low and heavy workloads on muscle strength and neuromuscular function of quadriceps muscle.
METHODS: Thirty male subjects (age, mean±SD, 20.6±2.6 yr, body mass 70.4±12.9 kg, height 1.76±0.09 m) with no history of knee injury or trauma participated to the study. Subjects were randomly divided into two training groups, low workload training (40% 1RM) and heavy workload training (80% 1RM). One repetition of maximum leg-press measured before and after 12 weeks training. Moreover, surface electromyograpic signals were recorded from vastus medialis and lateralis muscle during one repetition of maximum leg-press before and after 12 weeks training.
RESULTS: High speed training with heavy workload-low repetition resulted in a greater increase (41.8%±4.3) in maximal concentric quadriceps strength compared with high speed training with low workloads-high repetition (23.3%±2.7; F=3.8, P<0.035). Average rectified value of EMG after 12 weeks high speed training with heavy workload- low repetition was significantly larger than those observed after high speed training with low workload- high repetition (F=5.5, P<0.039).
CONCLUSIONS: The result indicates that, high speed movement combined with heavy workload is an effective stimulus for neural adaptations to training, which in turn result in greater improvement in muscle strength.


KEY WORDS: Electromyography - Workload - Resistance training

top of page

Publication History

Issue published online: March 16, 2018
Article first published online: February 14, 2017
Manuscript accepted: February 6, 2017
Manuscript revised: January 30, 2017
Manuscript received: April 25, 2016

Cite this article as

Mazani AA, Hamedinia MR, Haghighi AH, Hedayatpour N. The effect of high speed strength training with heavy and low workloads on neuromuscular function and maximal concentric quadriceps strength. J Sports Med Phys Fitness 2018;58:428-34. DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.06655-5

Corresponding author e-mail

n.hedayatpour@ub.ac.ir