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THE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology


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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS


The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2018 January-February;58(1-2):66-72

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.16.06759-1

Copyright © 2016 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Adaptations in movement performance after plyometric training on mini-trampoline in children

Fotini ARABATZI

Laboratory of Neuromechanics, Department of Physical Education and Sport Science, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Serres, Greece


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BACKGROUND: Deficits in postural control and skill performance are important intrinsic fall risk factors. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of trampoline plyometrics on postural control, and jumping height in prepubertal children.
METHODS: Twenty-two school children were assigned to either a trampoline group (TPLG, N.=12, 7 girls and 5 boys, age =9.30±0.55 years) or a control group (CG, N.=12, 8 girls and 4 boys, age =9.30±0.55 years). The TPLG participated in 4 weeks plyometric training on a mini-trampoline (3 times per week) integrated in their physical education lessons while the CG attended the standard physical education curriculum at school. Pre- and postintervention included the measurements of postural sway and maximum height in countermovement and drop jump.
RESULTS: Postural sway decreased significantly (P<0.05) in normal quiet stance (NQS) for the TPLG but not for the CG. Statistically significant decreases in postural sway in the anteroposterior direction during one-leg stance (OLS) were found for the TPLG whereas postural sway was unchanged at both directions for control group. Furthermore, statistically significant improvements in jump height were found only for TPLG after training (P<0.05).
CONCLUSIONS: Training on elastic surface could be incorporated into children’s exercise programs aiming to enhance balance and lower-limb strength to reduce injury rates. For injury prevention during trampoline training, close supervision by experienced personnel is recommended.


KEY WORDS: Postural balance - Proprioception - Child

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Publication History

Issue published online: November 29, 2017
Article first published online: November 4, 2016
Manuscript accepted: October 18, 2016
Manuscript revised: October 10, 2016
Manuscript received: June 9, 2016

Cite this article as

Arabatzi F. Adaptations in movement performance after plyometric training on mini-trampoline in children. J Sports Med Phys Fitness 2018;58:66-72. DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.16.06759-1

Corresponding author e-mail

farabaji@phed-sr.auth.gr