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THE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS


The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2017 November;57(11):1432-44

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.06940-7

Copyright © 2017 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Peak versus mean propulsive power outputs: which is more closely related to jump squat performance?

Irineu LOTURCO 1, 2 , Lucas A. PEREIRA 1, Ronaldo KOBAL 1, Katia KITAMURA 1, Cesar C. CAL ABAD 1, Fábio Y. NAKAMURA 1, 3, Chi N. PAI 2

1 Nucleus of High Performance in Sport (NAR), São Paulo, Brazil; 2 Department of Mechatronics Engineering, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 3 Department of Physical Education, State University of Londrina, Londrina, Brazil


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BACKGROUND: This study aimed to compare the predictive value of muscle power (peak power, mean power until the peak-velocity or mean propulsive power) in relation to the jump height achieved during the jump squat performed at different loads.
METHODS: One hundred and ninety-four elite athletes performed jump squats against loads corresponding to 40%, 60%, and 80% of their respective body mass. A linear regression analysis was performed to establish the relationship between muscle power expressions and jump squat height.
RESULTS: The coefficient of determination (R2) in the different linear regression models between muscle power-related variables and jump squat height, for the different load ranges, varied from 0.50 to 0.57 (for absolute power values) and from 0.72 to 0.78 (for relative power values [W/kg]). The mean propulsive power presented similar capacity to predict the jump squat height as the peak power-related values. For all analyzed variables, this prediction power was increased when the absolute power values were normalized by the individuals’ body mass.
CONCLUSIONS: Selection of the values related to the mean propulsive phase to assess top-level athletes might be considered as an advantageous alternative, due to its adequacy to properly reflect the neuromuscular potential of the subjects in both ballistic and traditional exercises.


KEY WORDS: Muscle strength - Athletes - Athletic performance

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Publication History

Issue published online: September 4, 2017
Article first published online: January 13, 2017
Manuscript accepted: January 5, 2017
Manuscript revised: November 29, 2016
Manuscript received: August 22, 2016

Cite this article as

Loturco I, Pereira LA, Kobal R, Kitamura K, Cal Abad CC, Nakamura FY, et al. Peak versus mean propulsive power outputs: which is more closely related to jump squat performance? J Sports Med Phys Fitness 2017;57:1432-44. DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.06940-7

Corresponding author e-mail

irineu.loturco@terra.com.br