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THE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology


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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS


The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2017 November;57(11):1407-14

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.07030-X

Copyright © 2017 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

The sex-specific internal and external demands imposed on players during Ultimate Frisbee game-play

Maria C. MADUENO 1, Crystal O. KEAN 1, Aaron T. SCANLAN 1, 2

1 School of Medical and Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, Australia; 2 Human Exercise and Training Laboratory, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, Australia


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BACKGROUND: Despite the growing popularity of Ultimate Frisbee (UF) across sexes, the game demands imposed on players have been predominately examined in males. This study aimed to compare the internal and external demands of UF game-play in males and females.
METHODS: Male (N.=10) and female (N.=10) recreational UF players competed in separate sex-specific, indoor UF games. Internal responses (blood lactate concentration [BLa-], rating of perceived exertion [RPE], and heart rate [HR]) and external responses (direction-specific and total relative PlayerLoad™ [PL], and estimated equivalent distance [EED]) were measured. Data were analyzed using mixed ANOVAs with Cohen’s effect sizes (d).
RESULTS: During male game-play, significantly (P<0.01) higher BLa- (d=1.30, large), HR (d=0.40, small), PL (d=0.80-1.24, moderate-large), and EED (d=0.93, moderate) were apparent during the first half compared to the second half in males. During female game-play, a significantly (P<0.001) larger RPE (d=0.93, moderate) was evident during the second compared to the first half. In addition, females exhibited significantly (P<0.05) lower BLa- (d=1.43, large) in the first half and higher medio-lateral PL (d=1.10, moderate) in the second half compared to males.
CONCLUSIONS: While similar global responses were observed between sexes across UF game-play, males experienced greater declines in physiological intensity and multi-directional activity than females. These data indicate overlap in game demands and training recommendations across sexes, with activity maintenance a focus, particularly in males.


KEY WORDS: Physiology - Heart rate - Technology - Instrumentation

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Publication History

Issue published online: September 4, 2017
Article first published online: January 17, 2017
Manuscript accepted: January 5, 2017
Manuscript revised: December 5, 2016
Manuscript received: September 22, 2016

Cite this article as

Madueno MC, Kean CO, Scanlan AT. The sex-specific internal and external demands imposed on players during Ultimate Frisbee game-play. J Sports Med Phys Fitness 2017;57:1407-14. DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.07030-X

Corresponding author e-mail

a.scanlan@cqu.edu.au