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THE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology


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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2017 October;57(10):1237-44

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.06901-8

Copyright © 2017 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

A comparison of assisted, resisted, and common plyometric training modes to enhance sprint and agility performance

Kazem KHODAEI 1 , Abbas MOHAMMADI 2, Neda BADRI 3

1 Physical Education and Sport Sciences Faculty, Urmia University, Urmia, Iran; 2 Department of Physical Education, Islamic Azad University, Sabzevar Branch, Sabzevar, Iran; 3 Physical Education and Sport Sciences Faculty, Hakim Sabzevari University, Sabzevar, Iran


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BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of assisted, resisted and common plyometric training modes to enhance sprint and agility performance. Thirty active young males (age 20.67±1.12, height 174.83±4.69, weight 63.45±7.51) volunteered to participate in this study that 24 completed testing.
METHODS: The participants were randomly assigned into different groups: assisted, resisted and common plyometric exercises groups. Plyometric training involved three sessions per week for 4 weeks. The volume load of plyometric training modes was equated between the groups. The posttest was performed after 48 hours of the last training session. Between-group differences were analyzed with the ANCOVA and LSD post-hoc tests, and within-group differences were analyzed by a paired t-test.
RESULTS: The findings of the present study indicated that 0-10-m, 20-30-m sprint time and the Illinois Agility Test time significantly decreased in the assisted and resisted plyometrics modes compared to the common plyometric training mode (P≤0.05). Also, the 0-10-m, 0-30-m sprint time and agility T-test time was significantly reduced with resisted plyometrics modes compared to the assisted and common plyometric modes (P≤0.05). There was no significant difference in the 10-20-m sprint time among the three plyometric training modes.
CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study demonstrated that assisted and resisted plyometrics modes with elastic bands were effective methods to improve sprint and agility performance than common plyometric training in active males. Also, the resisted plyometrics mode was superior than the assisted plyometrics mode to improving sprint and agility tasks.


KEY WORDS: Sports - Plyometric exercise - Athletic performance

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Publication History

Issue published online: August 30, 2017
Article first published online: January 23, 2017
Manuscript accepted: January 17, 2017
Manuscript revised: December 23, 2016
Manuscript received: August 4, 2016

Cite this article as

Khodaei K, Mohammadi A, Badri N. A comparison of assisted, resisted, and common plyometric training modes to enhance sprint and agility performance. J Sports Med Phys Fitness 2017;57:1237-44. DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.06901-8

Corresponding author e-mail

k.khodaei@urmia.ac.ir