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ORIGINAL ARTICLES  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2016 April;56(4):422-7

Copyright © 2016 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Correlation of ankle eversion to inversion strength ratio and static balance in dominant and non-dominant limbs of basketball players

Rachana DABADGHAV

Sancheti Institute College of Physiotherapy, Sancheti Health Care Academy, Pune, India


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BACKGROUND: To compare ankle eversion to inversion strength ratio (E/I R) and static balance control between the dominant and non-dominant limbs of basketball players and to correlate ankle E/I R and static balance control in the dominant and non-dominant limbs of basketball players.
METHODS: Twenty-one healthy basketball players in the age-group of 18-25 years participated in this study. Isokinetic ankle eversion and inversion muscle strength was assessed at 30°/s and 120°/s in both dominant and non-dominant limbs using the Biodex isokinetic dynamometer. Similarly balance was assessed on a force platform with eyes open and eyes closed in both dominant and non-dominant limbs.
RESULTS: Repeated measure ANOVA for strength measurement, found that there was significant main effect of speed, P=0.001 (P<0.05). However, there was no significant main effect in the sides P=0.099 (P<0.05). There was significant main effect of sides with respect to balance. Balance was affected more in non-dominant limb P=0.000 as compared to dominant limb. However, there was not much of a significant difference with eyes open and eyes closed position.
CONCLUSIONS: The E/I ratio was >1.0 at the angular velocity of 120°/s increasing the chances of ankle injuries in basketball players. There was no correlation between ankle strength and balance in both dominant and non-dominant limbs.

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