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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2015 October;55(10):1174-83

Copyright © 2015 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Etiology of musculoskeletal injuries in amateur breakdancers

Joka T. 1, Clarke N. D. 2, Cohen D. D. 3, Delextrat A. 4

1 Department of Sports Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, London metropolitan University, London, UK; 2 Department of Biomolecular and Sport Science, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Coventry University, Coventry, UK; 3 Salud Comuniudes, University of Santander (UDES), Bucaramanga, Colombia; 4 Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Headington, UK


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AIM: The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of musculoskeletal injuries in breakdancers and investigate the association with training habits.
METHODS: Forty-six males and sixteen females completed a questionnaire regarding their training and competition habits (frequency, warm-up and stretching, strength training, protective equipment, move types and supervision) and the musculoskeletal injuries sustained as a result of breakdancing in the previous 12 months. The effects of training habits and sex on injury rates were analyzed by a Mann-Whitney Test and a Kruskal-Wallis Test, while a stepwise linear regression analysis assessed the link between injury rates and quantitative risk factors.
RESULTS: The injury rate was 4.02 injuries per 1000 h, with no significant difference between males and females (P>0.05). The main injuries affected were the knee (23.4%) and wrist (15.3%), and females were characterized by a significantly greater number of finger injuries and a lower number of shoulder injuries that males (P<0.05). In addition, of all the factors evaluated, only the amount of time spent performing breakdance training showed a significant association with injury rate (P<0.05).
CONCLUSION: These results suggest that interventions should focus on protecting specific body parts and improving training quality and recovery.

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