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ORIGINAL ARTICLES  BODY COMPOSITION 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2015 October;55(10):1166-73

Copyright © 2015 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Differences in regional adiposity, bone mineral density, and physical exercise participation based on exercise self-efficacy among senior adults

Glenn J. M. 1, Gray M. 2, Vincenzo J. L. 3

1 Sport & Movement Science Lab, Department of Kinesiology, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA, USA; 2 Human Performance Lab, Office for Studies on Aging, Department of Health, Human Performance and Recreation, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 3 Department of Physical Therapy, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Fayetteville, AR, USA


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AIM: The impact of exercise self-efficacy levels (ESE) on exercise participation, levels of body fat (BF), and bone mineral density (BMD) are unclear in senior-aged adults. The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of ESE on exercise participation, regional distribution of BF, and BMD among seniors.
METHODS: Senior adults (N.=76; 36 males, 40 females) were separated into tertiles (T1, age=60.4±1.4; T2, age=61.3±1.4; T3, age=60.4±1.5) based on self-reported levels of ESE. BMD and regional BF were measured using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and exercise participation levels were measured using the Rapid Physical-Activity Questionnaire.
RESULTS: MANOVA revealed a significant Wilks Lambda (p < 0.001) and univariate analysis was completed for exercise participation levels, android BF, gynoid BF, and spinal BMD. ANOVA revealed T3 was significantly lower for android BF (p=0.002) than T1 and T2 (30% and 26%, respectively) while gynoid BF was significantly lower (p=0.012) for T3 (24%) compared to T1. When evaluating exercise participation levels, T3 was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than T1 or T2. Spinal BMD was significantly higher (p=0.030) between T2 (10%) and T1.
CONCLUSION: ESE is an important factor in senior adults ability to maintain longitudinal health.

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