Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2015 May;55(5) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2015 May;55(5):390-6

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe PROMO
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLES  EXCERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2015 May;55(5):390-6

Copyright © 2015 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

The importance of open- and closed-skill agility for team selection of adult male basketball players

Scanlan A. T. 1, 2, 3, Tucker P. S. 1, 2, 3, Dalbo V. J. 1, 2, 3

1 Institute for Health and Social Science Research, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, Australia; 2 Human Exercise and Training Laboratory, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, Australia; 3 Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, Australia


PDF


AIM: Open-skill agility qualities have yet to be described in adult male basketball players. Further, the importance of open- and closed-skill agility for team selection remains unknown. Thus, this study aimed to: 1) describe the open- and closed-skill agility of adult male basketball players; and 2) compare these properties between starting and non-starting players.
METHODS: A cross-sectional between-group design was used. Six starting (playing time: 30.1±8.8 min; age: 30.5±4.8 years; height: 192.1±7.7 cm; body mass: 100.5±15.0 kg; VO2max: 48.4±6.6 mL∙kg-1∙min-1) and six non-starting (4.3±3.6 min; 21.3±5 years; 185.7±7.4 cm; 94.4±17.9 kg; 50.6±3.9 mL∙kg-1∙min-1) state-level basketball players completed multiple trials for the Change of Direction Speed Test (CODST) and Reactive Agility Test (RAT).
RESULTS: No statistically significant between-group differences were evident for CODST movement time (starters: 1.652±0.047 s; non-starters: 1.626±0.040 s, P=0.68), RAT response time (starters: 307.5±100.5 ms; non-starters: 426.5±140.7 ms, P=0.12), and RAT decision-making time (starters: 110.7±11.0 ms; non-starters: 147.3±14.2 ms, P=0.08). However, starters (2.001±0.051 s) possessed significantly (P=0.02) faster RAT total movement times than non-starters (2.182±0.040 s).
CONCLUSION: These data support the utility of perceptual and cognitive components of agility performance in distinguishing starting from non-starting players in basketball. Consequently, basketball coaching and conditioning staff should incorporate sport-specific reactive training drills for all players during the annual conditioning plan.

top of page