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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2013 December;53(6):665-70

Copyright © 2013 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Relationships between biochemical and physiological changes induced by exercise in postmyocardial infarction patients

Liu X., Tan S. J., Chen Y. P., Liu J., Liang X. L., Li C. M., Shi X. M., Zhao N. N.

Department of Human Movement Science Tianjin University of Sport, Tianjin 300381, PR China


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Aim: Aim of the study was to examine the relationships between biochemical and physiological changes induced by exercise in postmyocardial infarction patients (PMIP) during the early stages of cardiac rehabilitation.
Methods: Forty-nine male non-blockade recent PMIP, aged 63.8±4.7 years, performed a graded exercise test on a motorised treadmill until volitional cessation or reaching any of the American College of Sports Medicine criteria. Blood pressure and rate-pressure product (RPP) were recorded every three minutes. A 12-lead electrocardiogram was monitored continuously and heart rate (HR) was taken from this. Blood samples were obtained by two methods; those used for testing blood lactate (BL) were taken from an already warmed finger tip before and during exercise, and the others used for enzymatic analysis based on lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme 1 (LDH-1), creatine kinase (CK) and creatine kinase polypeptide sub-unit MB (CK-MB) were collected by venipuncture from the antecubital vein pre and immediate post exercise test.
Results: Highly significant correlations existed between exercise-induced changes in HR, RPP, BL and ST segment level with increased enzymes activity in serum, and 73.1% to 90.1% of the variance in percentage increase of the enzyme activity could be predicted from the variance in percentage increase of HR during exercise. However, the mechanism of these relationships may differ.
Conclusion: Since the rise in serum enzymes during submaximal exercise is primarily attributed to changes in membrane permeability in fatigued muscle, these relationships provide useful guidance to health professionals obtaining biochemical information about muscle fatigue.

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