Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2012 December;52(6) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2012 December;52(6):631-8

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints
Permissions

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLES  SPORTS INJURIES AND REHABILITATION 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2012 December;52(6):631-8

Copyright © 2012 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Injury risk in professional football players with special reference to the playing position and training periodization

Mallo J. 1, Dellal A. 2, 3, 4

1 Sports Department, Faculty of Physical Activity and Sport. Technical University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain; 2 Fitness Training Department, OGC Nice, Nice, France; 3 Santy Orthopedicae Clinical, Sport Science and Research Department, Lyon, France; 4 Tunisian Research Laboratory “Sport Performance Optimisation”, National Centre of Medicine and Science in Sport (CNMSS), El Menzah, Tunisia


PDF


AIM: The aim of this study was to examine injury incidence in professional football players according to the playing positions and with a special reference to training periodization.
METHODS: A Spanish professional team was followed prospectively for the 2007-08 and 2008-09 seasons and exposure times and time-loss injuries were individually recorded during all training sessions and matches. Heart rate was monitored in all training sessions.
RESULTS: total of 114 injuries were registered during the study period (mean injury incidence: 6.6 injuries per 1000 hours). The frequency of injuries was not uniformly distributed by playing positions (P<0.001), as forwards and central defenders sustained the greatest number of injury episodes and the highest match absence. Ligament sprains and muscle strains accounted for 50% of all injuries and 62% of all match absences. The highest incidence of sprains was achieved during pre-season and the beginning of the competition period. The risk to sustain a muscular strain peaked at the beginning and in the final weeks of the competition period and was related (r=0.72; P<0.05) to mean heart rate during the training stage.
CONCLUSION: The results suggest that there exists a difference of injury risk according to the period of the season and therefore, injury prevention strategies should be introduced from pre-season. Moreover, training workloads should be controlled to avoid increasing the risk of muscle strains.

top of page