Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2010 September;50(3) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2010 September;50(3):268-73

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe PROMO
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints
Permissions

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLES   

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2010 September;50(3):268-73

Copyright © 2010 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Effects of acute exercise on inspiratory muscle strength and endurance in untrained women and men

Gonzales J. U., Williams J. S.

1 Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, USA; 2 Texas State University, San Marcos, TX, USA


PDF


AIM: The purpose of this study was to determine if sex differences are present in exercise-induced inspiratory muscle function in untrained humans.
METHODS: Eight young untrained women (23.8 ± 1.5 y, VO2max = 33.7 ± 4.0 mL/kg/min) and men (26.1 ± 2.0 y, VO2max = 36.7 ± 1.2 mL/kg/min) performed high-intensity cycling exercise (80% WRmax) to exhaustion. Inspiratory muscle strength and endurance were assessed pre- and post-exercise by measuring maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax) and time to task failure during a constant-load breathing test (CLBT), respectively.
RESULTS: Relative intensity and time to exhaustion during high-intensity exercise was similar between women and men. Prior to exercise, PImax was similar between sexes. After exercise, women and men showed similar reductions in PImax (W: 140.4 ± 9.9 to 124.6 ± 6.7 cm H2O, P<0.05; M: 147.7 ± 10.2 to 128.1 ± 11.1 cm H2O, P<0.05). No sex difference was found in the magnitude change in PImax following exercise (W: 15.8 ± 7.9 vs. M: 19.6 ± 4.7 cm H2O). Time to task failure on the CLBT was reduced following exercise in women (360 ± 54 to 135 ± 29 s, P<0.05) and men (270 ± 36 to 150 ± 17 s, P<0.05). Women exhibited a greater reduction in time to task failure following exercise than men (W: 225 ± 55 vs. M: 120 ± 38 s, P=0.05).
CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that women exhibit a greater reduction in inspiratory muscle endurance following an acute bout of high-intensity exercise than men.

top of page