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Original articles  EPIDEMIOLOGY AND CLINICAL MEDICINE 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2010 March;50(1):72-8

Copyright © 2010 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Gender comparison of C-reactive protein and cardiovascular disease risk in college students and intercollegiate atlete

Orri J. C. 1, Carter S. R. 2, Howington E. B. 3

1 Department of Exercise and Sport Science, University of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; 2 Advanced Rehabilitation Centre, Windsor, Ontario, Canada; 3 Department of Management, Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA, USA


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AIM: Research involving coronary artery disease (CAD) risk in young adults is limited; therefore we compared cardiovascular risk between college-aged men and women.
METHODS: Thirty college men and women volunteered as study subjects. CAD risk assessment included systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), waist circumference, percent body fat (%BF), maximum oxygen consumption, fasting plasma C-reactive protein (CRP), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), Body Mass Index (BMI) and fasting glucose. Risk factors were compared between groups using a t-test and Pearson product moment correlations were used to determine the relationships between CRP and CAD risk factors.
RESULTS: Statistically significant differences were observed for HDL, TC/HDL ratio, SBP, and %BF, between men and women. Total cholesterol and CRP concentration were not different between men and women. Log CRP was positively correlated with %BF and BMI. Further, 47% of the subjects met the criteria for one or more risk factors for CAD, as specified by the American College of CONCLUSION: Our data indicate a gender difference in CAD risk in college students with similar reported activity. Waist circumference, fasting glucose, % body fat, and BMI are associated with CRP in college age men and women.

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