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Original articles  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2005 September;45(3):270-6

Copyright © 2009 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Physiological and biomechanical responses while running with and without a stroller

Smith J. D. 1, Smith J. D. 2, Kinser K. B. 3, Dugan E. 4, Reed M. 5

1 Department of Health and Physical Education Texas A & M University, Kingsville, TX, USA 2 Biomechanics Laboratory, The Penn State University University Park, PA, USA 3 Department of Health and Physical Education Tarrant County College: South Campus Campus Dr Fort Worth, TX, USA 4 Ball State University, Muncie, IN, USA 5 Northwestern College, Orange City, IA, USA


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Aim. This ­study exam­ined the ­effects of push­ing a jog­ging strol­ler on bio­me­chan­i­cal and phys­io­log­i­cal var­i­ables. The hypoth­e­sis was ­that run­ning ­with a strol­ler for 30 min­utes ­would short­en ­stride ­length and ­increase phys­io­log­i­cal indi­ces of exer­cise.
Methods. Experimental ­design: ­this was a repeat­ed meas­ures ­design. Setting: par­tic­i­pants ­were recruit­ed ­from ­road rac­es in the Dallas/Fort Worth, TX ­area. Graded exer­cise ­tests ­were per­formed in a labor­a­to­ry set­ting, ­field ­tests ­were per­formed on a 400 m all-weath­er out­door ­track. Participants: 5 ­males and 5 ­females ­were ­assessed. Interventions: par­tic­i­pants per­formed a grad­ed exer­cise ­test and 2 ­field ­tests. The 1st ­field ­test ­involved run­ning at 75% V.O2max for 30 min­utes with­out a strol­ler and the 2nd ­involved run­ning at the ­same ­speed ­with the strol­ler. Measures: V.O2, ­stride ­length, ­heart ­rate, lac­tate, ven­ti­la­tion, and RPE ­were eval­u­at­ed.
Results. No dif­fer­enc­es for V.O2 or ­stride ­length ­were evi­dent. Heart ­rate (p=0.0001), lac­tate con­cen­tra­tion (p=0.025), ven­ti­la­tion (p=0.009), and RPE (p=0.002) ­increased ­from 10 to 30 min­utes ­while run­ning ­with the strol­ler. Heart ­rate (p=0.002), lac­tate con­cen­tra­tion (p=0.0001), ven­ti­la­tion (p=0.006), and RPE (p=0.001) ­were sig­nif­i­cant­ly high­er ­while run­ning ­with the strol­ler ­after 30 min­utes com­pared to run­ning with­out it.
Conclusion. These ­results indi­cate ­that push­ing a strol­ler ­affects ­some indi­ces of exer­cise inten­sity ­while run­ning. Gait ­does not ­change. These ­data do not sup­port an asso­ci­a­tion ­between strol­ler use dur­ing run­ning and an ­increase ­risk of ortho­pe­dic inju­ry. Further stud­ies ­should exam­ine ­these var­i­ables at low­er inten­sities ­that are run by ­most rec­re­a­tion­al jog­gers.

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