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Original articles  SPORT INJURIES AND REHABILITATION 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2005 March;45(1):93-7

Copyright © 2009 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Symptomatic accessory soleus muscle. Report of 18 cases in athletes

Rossi F., Dragoni S.

National Institute of Sports Medicine Italian Olympic Committee, Rome, Italy


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Aim. The aim of ­this ­paper was to inves­ti­gate the prev­a­lence and ­sports dis­tri­bu­tion in ath­letes.
Methods. Six hun­dred and fif­ty radio­graphs of ath­letes affect­ed by ten­der­ness and exer­tion­al ­pain in the ­region of the Achilles ten­don, ­were ­observed ­over a peri­od of 30 ­years. The clin­i­cal and diag­nos­tic imag­ing mate­ri­als ­were ­reviewed.
Results. Eighteen cas­es of acces­so­ry symp­to­mat­ic sole­us mus­cle ­were diag­nosed: in 10 cas­es ­using ­soft tis­sue radio­graph­ic tech­nique, in 8 cas­es ­using, in ­sequence, exclu­sive­ly ultra­sound and mag­net­ic res­o­nance.
Conclusion. The pres­ence of an acces­so­ry sole­us mus­cle has ­been con­sid­ered a ­rare ­even inci­den­tal occur­rence; the ­review of our cas­es, sub­stan­tial­ly dif­fer­ent for the evi­dent symp­toms, ­showed a fre­quen­cy in ath­letes of 2.77% in accor­dance ­with the ­results of the ana­tom­i­cal and clin­i­cal lit­er­a­ture. US and MRI are the ­best diag­nos­tic modal­ities espe­cial­ly in dif­fer­en­tiat­ing acces­so­ry sole­us mus­cle ­from ­soft tis­sue ­tumors not ­rare in ­this ana­tom­ic ­region.

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