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Original articles  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2004 September;44(3):224-32

Copyright © 2009 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

The effects of rest interval and resistance training on quadriceps femoris muscle. Part II: EMG and perceived exertion

Pincivero D. M. 1, Campy R. M. 2, Karunakara R. G. 3

1 Human Performance and Fatigue Laboratory Department of Kinesiology University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USA 2 Department of Physical Education, Health and Recreation Eastern Washington University, Cheney, WA, USA 3 Department of Medicine St. Mary’s Hospital, Rochester, NY, USA


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Aim. ­The pur­pose of ­this ­study was to ­examine the ­effects of ­rest ­interval on quad­ri­ceps fem­oris ­muscle acti­va­tion and per­ceived exer­tion, ­during ­short-­term resis­tance ­training.
­Methods. ­Vastus medi­alis (VM) and ­vastus lat­er­alis (VL) ­muscle elec­tro­myo­grams (EMG) ­were ­assessed in 15 ­males ­during a sus­tained 80% max­imal vol­un­tary con­trac­tion (MVC). ­During the pre-­training eval­u­a­tion, the abso­lute ­value of the 80% MVC (N.m) and con­trac­tion dura­tion (s) was per­formed at 2, 4, and 6 ­weeks ­during the ­training ­period. Per­ceived exer­tion was meas­ured via the ­Borg cat­e­gory-­ratio ­scale ­every 5 s ­during the 80% MVC. Sub­jects ­were ran­domly ­assigned to 3 ­groups: ­group 1 ­received a 40 s ­rest ­interval in ­between exer­cise ­sets, ­group 2 ­received a ­rest ­period of 160 s, and the con­trol ­group did not par­tic­i­pate in ­training. ­Groups 1 and 2 per­formed iso­ki­netic ­knee exten­sions at 180 deg.s-1 2 ­days per ­week for 6 ­weeks.
­Results. The ­results dem­on­strated a sig­nif­i­cant ­decrease in VM EMG ­within the ­initial por­tion of the 80% MVC ­across the ­training ­period in the ­short ­rest ­interval ­group. The ­long ­rest ­interval and con­trol ­groups ­showed no sig­nif­i­cant ­changes in VM EMG ­during 1st ­part of the con­trac­tion ­across the ­training ­period, ­whereas the con­trol ­group exhib­ited a sig­nif­i­cant reduc­tion in VL EMG ­across ­weeks 4 to 6. VL EMG ­increased ­during the 80% MVC in the con­trol ­group ­across the ­training ­period. VM EMG ­increased ­during the sus­tained con­trac­tions in the ­long ­rest ­interval and con­trol ­groups ­across the ­training ­period. The per­ceived exer­tion ­response was ­lower in the 1st ­part of the 80% MVC in the ­short and ­long ­rest ­interval ­groups, but not in the con­trol ­group, ­across the ­training ­period. The ­results ­also ­showed a sig­nif­i­cant ­decrease in per­ceived exer­tion at the end of the sus­tained con­trac­tion in the ­short ­rest ­interval ­group, but not in the ­long ­rest ­interval ­group or the con­trol ­group.
Con­clu­sion. The find­ings ­from ­this ­study sug­gest ­that the appli­ca­tion of rel­a­tively ­short ­rest inter­vals in ­between ­sets of resis­tance exer­cise ­induced a ­greater neu­ro­mus­cular ­response of the VM ­muscle ­during ­short-­term ­training.

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