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Original articles  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2003 September;43(3):291-9

Copyright © 2009 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Dependence of young female volleyballers’ performance on their body build, physical abilities, and psycho-physiological properties

Stamm R. 1, Veldre G. 2, Stamm M. 3, Thomson K. 3, Kaarma H. 4, Loko J. 1, Koskel S. 5

1 Institute of Sport Pedagogy Faculty of Exercise and Sport Sciences University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia 2 Institute of Zoology and Hydrobiology Faculty of Biology and Geography University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia 3 Faculty of Exercise and Sport Sciences Tallinn Pedagogical University, Tallinn, Estonia 4 Centre for Physical Anthropology Institute of Anatomy Faculty of Medicine and University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia 5 Institute of Mathematical Statistics Faculty of Mathematics University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia


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Aim. The aim of the ­study was to estab­lish ­which anthro­po­metric char­ac­ter­is­tics, phys­ical abil­ities and ­psycho-phys­io­log­ical prop­er­ties deter­mine the suc­cess of ado­les­cent ­female vol­ley­ballers at com­pe­ti­tions.
­Methods. For ­this pur­pose we ­studied 32 ­female vol­ley­ballers ­aged 13-16 ­years. The anthro­po­metric exam­ina­tion ­included 43 meas­ure­ments, 7 ­tests of phys­ical fit­ness, and 4 ­series of com­pu­ter­ised ­psycho-phys­io­log­ical ­tests (n=21). The per­for­mance of ­game ele­ments was meas­ured empir­i­cally ­during cham­pion­ship ­games ­using the orig­inal com­puter pro­gram “­Game”.
­Results. The pro­fi­ciency of per­forming vol­ley­ball ele­ments — ­serve, recep­tion, ­feint, ­block and ­spike — was cal­cu­lated by regres­sion ­models ­from the 14 anthro­po­metric meas­ure­ments, 4 phys­ical fit­ness and 7 psy­cho­phys­io­log­ical ­test ­results, ­which ­showed sig­nif­i­cant cor­re­la­tion ­with pro­fi­ciency in the ­game. The pre­dic­tive ­power of the ­models was at ­least 32% and in ­average 56%. The anthro­po­metric ­factor was sig­nif­i­cant in the per­for­mance of all the ele­ments of the ­game, ­being ­most essen­tial (71-83%) for ­attack, ­block and ­feint. ­Good ­results in phys­ical ­ability ­tests ­granted suc­cess in ­serve, ­attack and recep­tion.
Con­clu­sion. It was pos­sible to pre­dict the effi­ciency of recep­tion (44%) by endu­rance, flex­ibility and ­speed meas­uring ­tests. Med­i­cine ­ball ­throwing ­test was essen­tial for ­attack (22%). ­Psycho-phys­io­log­ical ­tests ­were sig­nif­i­cant for the per­for­mance of ­block (98%), ­attack (80%), ­feint (60%) and recep­tion (39%).

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