Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2002 June;42(2) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2002 June;42(2):250-5

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

Publishing options
eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints
Permissions
Share

 

Original articles  BIOCHEMISTRY 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2002 June;42(2):250-5

Copyright © 2009 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Screening blood tests in members of the Israeli National Olympic team

Eliakim A. 1, 2, Nemet D. 2, Constantini N. 1

1 The Ribstein Center for Sport Medicine Sciences and Research, Wingate Institute, Netanya, Israel 2 Child Health and Sports Center, Pediatric Department, Meir General Hospital, Sapir Medical Center, Kfar-Saba, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel


PDF


Back­ground. ­Blood sam­ples are fre­quently col­lected in ­elite ath­letes in ­order to ­screen for pos­sible med­ical con­di­tions ­that ­might ­affect ­their ath­letic per­for­mance. How­ever, the ­extent of ­these ­blood ­screening pro­grams is not ­known.
­Methods. ­Blood sam­ples ­were col­lected ­from all mem­bers of the ­Israeli ­National ­Olympic ­team (n=114; 75 ­males, 39 ­females, ­mean age 23.4±0.5 ­years) to ­screen for pos­sible med­ical con­di­tions ­that ­might ­affect ­their ath­letic per­for­mance. All the ath­letes par­tic­i­pated in indi­vidual ­sports. ­Fasting, ­early ­morning ­blood was sam­pled ­from all the ath­letes ­during the ­early ­phases of the ­training ­season (­period of rel­a­tively ­light ­training). ­Blood was col­lected for eryth­ro­cyte sed­i­men­ta­tion ­rate, com­plete ­blood ­count, chem­istry ­panel, ­lipid pro­file, and ­iron ­stores anal­ysis.
­Results. Fif­teen ath­letes (13%; 9 ­females, 6 ­males) had low fer­ritin ­levels (<20 ng/ml) indi­cating ­decreased ­iron ­stores. ­Four of ­these ath­letes (3.5%) had ­overt ­iron defi­ciency ­anemia. Two ­other ath­letes had B12 defi­ciency ­anemia. ­Three ath­letes had ele­vated ­serum crea­ti­nine and ­urea. Sur­pris­ingly, ele­vated ­levels of cho­les­terol (>200 mg/dl) ­were ­found in 15 ath­letes (13%). More­over, 24 ath­letes (21%) had ­mild low HDL-cho­les­terol ­levels. No elec­tro­lyte abnor­mal­ities ­were ­found.
Con­clu­sions. Eval­u­a­tion of ­iron ­stores ­should be per­formed in ­elite ath­letes, due to the rel­a­tively ­high prev­a­lence of ­depleted ­iron ­stores and ­iron defi­ciency ­anemia, ­which may ­affect ­their ath­letic per­for­mance. We sug­gest ­that ­renal func­tion ­should be ­tested in ath­letes ­prior to the use of ­food sup­ple­ments and/or med­i­ca­tions ­that may inter­fere ­with ­their ­renal func­tion. Fur­ther ­studies are ­needed to deter­mine the ben­e­fits of ­screening ­tests in ­elite ath­letes.

top of page