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Original articles  CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2002 March;42(1):79-82

Copyright © 2009 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Heart rate variation after breath hold diving with different underwater swimming velocities

Delapille P., Verin E., Tourny Chollet C., Pasquis P.

1 Centres d’Etudes des Transformations des APS, University of Rouen, Rouen, France 2 Groupe de recherche sur le handicap et l’apprentissage locomoteur, Rouen, France 3 Laboratoire de Physiologie Respiratoire et Sportive, Hospital of Rouen, France


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Background. The aim of ­this ­study was to dem­on­strate the kinet­ics of ­heart ­rate and ­blood lac­tate lev­el ­obtained ­after repeat­ed ­short ­breath ­holds ­with mus­cu­lar ­effort in a swim­ming ­pool.
Methods. Experimental ­design: ­each sub­ject had to per­form a ­series of ­breath ­hold div­ing at ­rest and ­three ­series for dif­fer­ent under­wa­ter swim­ming veloc­ities. A ­series cor­re­spond­ed to six ­dives of a 30 sec­ dura­tion sep­ar­at­ed by a recov­ery peri­od of 30 sec­. Heart ­rates and ­blood lac­tate lev­els ­were meas­ured at ­rest and at the end of ­each ­series of ­breath ­holds. Participants: the pop­u­la­tion was com­posed of 10 ­male sub­jects divid­ed ­into one ­trained ­group (5 ­experts) and one ­group of 5 begin­ners.
Results. Results indi­cat­ed a high­er brad­y­car­dia for the ­expert ­group at stat­ic ­breath ­hold (54.25 vs 65.5 ­beats·min-1). At the end of a ­series of ­breath ­holds, tach­y­car­dia was high­er for begin­ners at dif­fer­ent under­wa­ter swim­ming veloc­ities. These val­ues ­were ­less sig­nif­i­cant ­than the ­heart ­rate meas­ured in labor­a­to­ry ­despite ­trials ­that ­were aban­doned due to ­high ­blood lac­tate lev­els ­above 3.5 ­mmol·l-1. In ­order to ­avoid the ­breath ­hold break­ing ­point, the max­i­mum ­heart ­rate had to cor­re­spond to the ­heart ­rate of the ven­til­a­to­ry thresh­old meas­ured in the labor­a­to­ry, ­minus the vari­a­tions of brad­y­car­dia meas­ured at ­rest.
Conclusions. For the train­ing ­coach, brad­y­car­dia was deter­mined by ­water immer­sion dur­ing a stat­ic ­breath ­hold. This per­mit­ted an eval­u­a­tion of the lev­el of div­er train­ing. A max­i­mal ­heart ­rate was attempt­ed to ­avoid the ­breath ­hold break­ing ­point. The ­results of ­this ­study may be use­ful in creat­ing an effec­tive div­er train­ing pro­gram.

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