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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2001 September;41(3):306-11

Copyright © 2002 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

The effects of sprint (300 m) running on plasma lactate, uric acid, creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase in competi-tive hurdlers and untrained men

Kłapcińska B., Iskra J., Poprzeçki S., Grzesiok K.

From the Department of Physiological and Medical Sciences * Department of Individual Sports, Academy of Physical Education, Katowice, Poland


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Background. High inten­sity exer­cise may ­induce mus­cle dam­age espe­cial­ly in indi­vid­u­als unac­cus­tomed to reg­u­lar phys­i­cal ­efforts. Our aim was to com­pare the ­impact of 300 m ­sprint run­ning on mus­cle ­enzymes ­release ­into ­blood in com­pet­i­tive hur­dlers and ­untrained but phys­i­cal­ly fit ­adults.
Methods. Experimental ­design: com­par­a­tive ­study. Setting: gen­er­al com­mu­nity. Participants: ­nine com­pet­i­tive hur­dlers (CH; 21.3 yrs±3.1) and six ­matched mod­er­ate­ly ­active ­untrained men (UT). Interventions: sub­jects per­formed a sin­gle 300 m ­sprint run­ning ­test. Measures: plasma crea­tine ­kinase (CK) and lac­tate dehy­drog­e­nase (LD) activ­ities, and con­cen­tra­tions of lac­tate (LA) and ­uric ­acid (UA) meas­ured ­before the ­warm-up and 5 min, 2 and 20 hrs ­postrun.
Results. Mean run­ner per­for­mance ­achieved by CH was sig­nif­i­cant­ly bet­ter (35.53-s±0.64) and LA con­cen­tra­tions sig­nif­i­cant­ly high­er (14.95 mM±0.59) ­than ­those record­ed in UT (41.52-s±2.22; 10.13 mM±0.59). Pre- and ­postrun CK activ­ities ­until the 2nd hour of recov­ery ­were ­found to be sig­nif­i­cant­ly high­er (p<0.05) in CH ­than in UT, where­as LD activ­ities ­were sim­i­lar in ­both ­groups pre­test, but sig­nif­i­cant­ly high­er in UT imme­di­ate­ly ­postrun. In CH, the high­est CK activ­ity (32% ­increase) was record­ed imme­di­ate­ly ­post-­test, where­as in UT the ­peak CK (135% ­increase) was ­attained in the 20th ­hour of recov­ery. In ­both ­groups UA ­reached the ­peak lev­el in the 2nd hour of recov­ery.
Conclusions. More pro­nounced and ­delayed ­postrun ­increase in CK, as record­ed in UT, may pro­vide evi­dence of a larg­er exer­cise-­induced mus­cle inju­ry in the ­untrained ­adults. Higher ­postexer­cise UA lev­els as record­ed in CH ­might ­account for a ­more ­marked involve­ment of aden­y­late ­kinase reac­tion in ATP resyn­the­sis.

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