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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2001 September;41(3):281-90

Copyright © 2002 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Effect of training on accumulated oxygen deficit and shuttle run performance

Ramsbottom R., Nevill A. M. *, Seager R. D. **, Hazeldine R. ***

From the School of Biological and Molecular Sciences Oxford Brookes University, Headington, Oxford * School of Sports, Performing Arts and Leisure, Walsall ** Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering Loughborough University, Loughborough *** Department of Physical Education Sports Science and Recreation Management Loughborough University Loughborough, United Kingdom


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Background. The pur­pose of the ­present ­study was to inves­ti­gate chang­es in phys­io­log­i­cal, meta­bol­ic and per­for­mance param­e­ters result­ing ­from an ­intense 6 ­week train­ing pro­gramme.
Methods. Sixteen vol­un­teers ­were divid­ed ­into a con­trol (CN; 4 men and 2 wom­en) and train­ing ­group (TR; 6 men and 4 wom­en). Laboratory meas­ures includ­ed max­i­mal aero­bic pow­er (V.O2max), sub­max­i­mal oxy­gen ­uptake (10.5% or 6° tread­mill incli­na­tion) and accu­mu­lat­ed oxy­gen def­i­cit (AOD). Performance was ­assessed dur­ing 20 ­metre shut­tle run ­tests (PST, pro­gres­sive shut­tle run ­test; ­HIST, ­high inten­sity shut­tle run ­test).
Results. TR ­improved ­their ­HIST per­for­mance (m) sig­nif­i­cant­ly com­pared ­with CN, iden­ti­fied by a sig­nif­i­cant “­group-by-training” inter­ac­tion (p<0.01). Similarly, AOD val­ues ­improved ­more in TR com­pared ­with CN (p<0.01). There was a ­trend for TR to fur­ther ­reduce ­blood pH val­ues ­after train­ing com­pared ­with CN, ­although ­this ­decrease (approx­i­mate­ly 0.05 ­units) did not ­attain sta­tis­ti­cal sig­nif­i­cance. The ­change in AOD was strong­ly cor­re­lat­ed ­with the ­change in run ­time to exhaus­tion (r=0.76, p<0.01) and the ­change in esti­mat­ed ­total ­work out­put (r=0.69, p<0.01) dur­ing 10.5% gra­di­ent ­run­ning and mod­est­ly cor­re­lat­ed ­with the ­change in ­HIST per­for­mance (r=0.49, p<0.05, assuming a direc­tion­al ­test).
Conclusions. The ­results of the ­present ­study sug­gest chang­es in the anaer­o­bic ­ca­pac­ity, deter­mined as AOD, due to train­ing may be reflect­ed in cor­re­spond­ing chang­es in labor­a­to­ry and ­field per­for­man­ce.

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