Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2001 March;41(1) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2001 March;41(1):121-3

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints
Permissions
Share

 

Original articles   

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2001 March;41(1):121-3

Copyright © 2009 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Colonic fermentation after ingestion of fructose-containing sports drink

Mitsui T., Shimaoka K., Kanao Y., Kondo T.

From the Research Center of Health, Physical Fitness and Sports Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan * Aichi Prefectural College of Nursing and Health, Nagoya, Japan


PDF


Back­ground. ­Many com­mer­cially avail­able ­sports ­drinks con­tain 5-6% car­bo­hy­drates, ­some of ­which is fruc­tose. How­ever, a ­number of ­studies of abdom­inal com­plaints ­have indi­cated fruc­tose mal­ab­sorp­tion. In the ­present ­study, we exam­ined ­colonic fer­men­ta­tion of a fruc­tose-con­taining ­sports ­drink.
­Methods. ­Colonic fer­men­ta­tion was deter­mined in ­normal sub­jects by mea­su­ring­ breath ­hydrogen ­after inges­tion of 350 ml ­sports ­drink, ­cow’s ­milk, or ­green tea ­with a 200 g ­rice ­ball.
­Results. The inci­dence of ­colonic fer­men­ta­tion ­after ­ingesting ­sports ­drink, ­milk, and ­green tea was ­five (62.5%), six (75%), and ­none (0%), respec­tively in ­eight sub­jects. ­Peak ­increases (ppm) ­after inges­tion of ­sports ­drink and ­milk ­varied ­from 0 to 6 (3.1±0.9) and 0 to 12 (6.5±1.7), respec­tively.
Con­clu­sions. ­Although the ­increase of ­breath ­hydrogen was not asso­ciated ­with abdom­inal dis­com­fort and its ­effect on exer­cise is ­still ­unclear, we sug­gest ­avoiding a ­large inges­tion of fruc­tose-con­taining ­sports ­drink ­before and ­during exer­cise.

top of page