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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2001 March;41(1):121-3

Copyright © 2009 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Colonic fermentation after ingestion of fructose-containing sports drink

Mitsui T., Shimaoka K., Kanao Y., Kondo T.

From the Research Center of Health, Physical Fitness and Sports Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan * Aichi Prefectural College of Nursing and Health, Nagoya, Japan


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Back­ground. ­Many com­mer­cially avail­able ­sports ­drinks con­tain 5-6% car­bo­hy­drates, ­some of ­which is fruc­tose. How­ever, a ­number of ­studies of abdom­inal com­plaints ­have indi­cated fruc­tose mal­ab­sorp­tion. In the ­present ­study, we exam­ined ­colonic fer­men­ta­tion of a fruc­tose-con­taining ­sports ­drink.
­Methods. ­Colonic fer­men­ta­tion was deter­mined in ­normal sub­jects by mea­su­ring­ breath ­hydrogen ­after inges­tion of 350 ml ­sports ­drink, ­cow’s ­milk, or ­green tea ­with a 200 g ­rice ­ball.
­Results. The inci­dence of ­colonic fer­men­ta­tion ­after ­ingesting ­sports ­drink, ­milk, and ­green tea was ­five (62.5%), six (75%), and ­none (0%), respec­tively in ­eight sub­jects. ­Peak ­increases (ppm) ­after inges­tion of ­sports ­drink and ­milk ­varied ­from 0 to 6 (3.1±0.9) and 0 to 12 (6.5±1.7), respec­tively.
Con­clu­sions. ­Although the ­increase of ­breath ­hydrogen was not asso­ciated ­with abdom­inal dis­com­fort and its ­effect on exer­cise is ­still ­unclear, we sug­gest ­avoiding a ­large inges­tion of fruc­tose-con­taining ­sports ­drink ­before and ­during exer­cise.

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