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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2000 December;40(4):319-26

Copyright © 2001 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Perceived exertion during isometric quadriceps contraction. A comparison between men and women

Pincivero D. M. 1, Coelho A. J. 2, Erikson W. H. 1

1 Human Performance and Fatigue Laboratory, Department of Physical Therapy, Eastern Washington University, Cheney, WA, USA; 2 Department of Physical Education, Health and Recreation, Eastern Washington University, Cheney, WA, USA


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Background. 1) To exam­ine the valid­ity and accu­ra­cy of the CR-10 ­scale for eval­u­at­ing per­ceived exer­tion, and 2) to ­assess gen­der dif­fer­enc­es in per­ceived exer­tion ­across dif­fer­ent lev­els of con­trac­tion inten­sity.
Methods. Experimental design: cross-sec­tion­al, com­par­a­tive ­design. Setting: Human Performance and Fatigue Laboratory, Eastern Washington University. Subjects: 30 ­healthy, col­lege age vol­un­teers (15 ­males, 15 ­females). Measures: All sub­jects ­were ­assessed for iso­met­ric ­torque and per­ceived exer­tion of the quad­ri­ceps fem­or­is mus­cles, via the CR-10 ­scale. One low ­anchor was ­applied ­under rest­ing con­di­tions ­with the ­knee ­flexed to 60 ­degrees, and a ­high ­anchor was ­applied dur­ing a max­i­mal vol­un­tary mus­cle con­trac­tion (MVC). Subjects per­formed ­five-sec­ond iso­met­ric con­trac­tions equiv­a­lent to 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, 70%, 80%, and 90% of ­their MVC, in a ran­dom ­order, and ­were ­assessed for per­ceived exer­tion by vis­u­al­ly observ­ing the CR-10 ­scale. One sam­ple “t”-­tests and 95% con­fi­dence inter­vals ­were cal­cu­lat­ed for per­ceived exer­tion at ­each rel­a­tive ­torque lev­el. A sin­gle fac­tor ANO­VA ­with repeat­ed meas­ures was per­formed ­across all lev­els of exer­cise inten­sity. Linearity for per­ceived exer­tion was ­assessed via regres­sion anal­y­sis.
Results. Perceived exer­tion at ­each exer­cise inten­sity ­were as fol­lows: 10%: 1.87±1.14, 20%: 2.43±1.19, 30%: 3.5±1.36, 40%: 3.97±1.52, 50%: 4.73±1.28, 60%: 5.53±1.28, 70%: 6.73±1.62, 80%: 7.57±1.72, and 90%: 8.6±1.52. The ­increase in per­ceived exer­tion ­across the inten­sity spec­trum was ­found to fit ­both lin­e­ar and quad­rat­ic ­trends. There ­were no gen­der dif­fer­enc­es in per­ceived exer­tion ­across all lev­els of exer­cise inten­sity.
Conclusions. The find­ings dem­on­strate ­that the CR-10 ­scale close­ly approx­i­mates per­ceived exer­tion of the quad­ri­ceps fem­or­is mus­cles dur­ing sub-max­i­mal, stat­ic con­trac­tions, and is not gen­der spe­cif­ic.

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