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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 1999 June;39(2):101-6

Copyright © 1999 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Characteristic feature of oxygen cost at simulated laboratory triathlon test in trained triathletes

Miura H. 1, Kitagawa K. 2, Ishiko T. 2

1 Laboratory for Sports Physiology, Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences, University of Tokushima, Tokushima, Japan; 2 Laboratory for Exercise Physiology and Biomechanics, School of Physical Education, Chukyo University, Toyota, Japan


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Back­ground. The ­present ­study was car­ried out in ­order to inves­ti­gate the res­pir­a­tory and cir­cu­la­tory fea­tures ­during a sim­u­lated labor­a­tory tri­athlon ­test in ­trained tri­ath­letes.
­Methods. Experi­mental ­design: Six­teen ­male tri­ath­letes ­were ­divided ­into ­superior (n=8) and ­slower tri­ath­letes (n=8) ­according to ­their ­race ­time. ­These sub­jects per­formed ­both max­imal exer­cise ­tests and a sim­u­lated labor­a­tory tri­athlon ­test (ST). The ­latter ­test con­sisted of ­flume-­pool swim­ming for 30 min, ergom­eter ­cycling for 75 min and tread­mill run­ning for 45 min as a con­tin­uous ­task. The exer­cise inten­sity was 60% of V.O2max ­during swim­ming, ­cycling and run­ning, respec­tively.
­Results. In ­slower tri­ath­letes, V.O2, ­minute ven­ti­la­tion (V.E), ­heart ­rate (HR) and tem­per­a­ture of ­external audi­tory ­canal ­were ­increased ­from an ear­lier ­stage com­pared ­with ­those in ­superior ath­letes. The per­cent ­increase (Δ) of V.O2, V.E and HR ­between the 10th and ­last min of ­cycling and run­ning ­stages in ­superior tri­ath­letes ­were sig­nif­i­cantly ­smaller ­than ­those in ­slower ath­letes. The ­oxygen ­cost (­oxygen ­uptake/run­ning ­velocity) of run­ning ­stage was sig­nif­i­cantly ­lower in ­superior tri­ath­letes (0.220±0.020 ml·kg-1·m-1) com­pared ­with ­slower ath­letes (0.264±0.014 ml·kg-1·m-1).
Con­clu­sions. ­These ­results sug­gest ­that ­superior tri­ath­letes per­formed ST ­more eco­nom­i­cally ­than ­slower ath­letes and had excel­lent ther­mo­reg­u­la­tory adap­ta­tion.

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