Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 1998 December;38(4) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 1998 December;38(4):344-54

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe PROMO
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints
Permissions

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLES   

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 1998 December;38(4):344-54

Copyright © 1999 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Can emotive imagery aid in tolerating exertion efficiently?

Coote D., Tenenbaum G.

Department of Psychology, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba Queensland, Australia


PDF


Back­ground. The ­study exam­ined the ­role of relax­ia­tion and aggres­sive ­types of ­imagery and the ­effect of ­goal orien­ta­tions, ­self effi­cacy, ­self con­trol, and deter­mi­na­tion on exer­tion tol­er­ance.
­Methods. Experi­mental ­design: the par­tic­i­pants under­went an exer­tive ­task in ­which ­they ­were ­required to ­squeeze a dyna­mom­eter, at 50% of ­their max­imal ­hand-­grip ­capacity, for as ­long as ­they ­could. Per­ceived exer­tion was meas­ured ­every 15 ­sec ­during the ­task. The ­time ­that ­elapsed ­between ­rating exer­tion as “­strong”, and drop­ping the ­handbar ­under 10% of the des­ig­nated 50% cri­terion, was con­sid­ered as the “­zone of exer­tion tol­er­ance”. Par­tic­i­pants: ­forty-­eight ­female uni­ver­sity stu­dents ­were ran­domly ­assigned ­into 3 ­groups. Inter­ven­tions: two ­imagery tech­niques, one ­under ­relaxing and one ­under aggres­sive con­di­tions ­were ­taught and ­then ­applied. In the con­trol con­di­tion, dis­cus­sions ­were con­ducted. Meas­ures: ­traits ­such as ­goal orien­ta­tion (­task and ego), phys­ical ­self-effi­cacy and ­self-con­trol ­were meas­ured ­prior to per­forming the ­task, ­while ­rate of per­ceived exer­tion ­task-spe­cific deter­mi­na­tion (i.e., ­task-­related con­fi­dence, com­mit­ment, exer­tion tol­er­ance, and ­effort invest­ment) ­were meas­ured ­before, ­during and ­after the ­task.
­Results. The ­results ­showed an ­average of 31% and 28% ­increase in exer­tion tol­er­ance in par­tic­i­pants who ­used aggres­sive and relax­a­tion ­imagery tech­niques respec­tively, com­pared to 4% reduc­tion in the con­trols. RM ­ANOVA indi­cated ­equality ­between the two ­imagery ­groups but ­both ­were sig­nif­i­cantly dif­ferent ­from the con­trol ­group. Phys­ical ­self-effi­cacy, ­self-con­trol, and ­task-spe­cific deter­mi­na­tion ­were ­found non­sig­nif­i­cant, but ­their impor­tant ­roles in ­coping ­with aver­sive ­stimuli are high­lighted. It was evi­dent ­that the “­coping” mech­a­nism ­rather ­than the “dis­trac­tion” mech­a­nism ­accounted for the ­larger sus­tain in the “­zone of exer­tion tol­er­ance”.
Con­clu­sions. ­Imagery can be ­used effi­ciently in exer­tion tol­er­ance but ­more ­studies are ­needed on ath­letes.

top of page