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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 1998 December;38(4):323-9

Copyright © 1999 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

The cardiovascular responses of male subjects to kung fu techniques. Expert/novice paradigm

Jones M. A., Unnithan V. B.

Department of Movement Science and Physical Education, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK


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Background. The pri­mary aim was to ­assess car­di­o­vas­cu­lar respons­es of ­expert and nov­ice sub­jects to ­kung fu tech­niques. It was hypo­the­sised ­that expe­ri­enced sub­jects ­would dem­on­strate ­improved econ­o­my of move­ment dur­ing the tech­niques, evi­denced by ­reduced exer­cise inten­sity.
Methods. Experi­men­tal ­design: a com­par­a­tive ­design was estab­lished util­is­ing two ­groups; expe­ri­enced (­group E), and nov­ice (group N). Set­ting: the exper­i­men­ta­tion ­took ­place ­under labor­a­to­ry con­di­tions, but was ­designed to max­i­mise exter­nal valid­ity.
Par­tic­i­pants: the ­only pres­e­lec­tion var­i­ables ­were reg­u­lar atten­dance at train­ing and expe­ri­ence. ­Nine expe­ri­enced ­males (­group E, exp 9.5±5.2 yrs) and ­nine nov­ice ­males (­group N, exp 1.2±0.1 yrs) par­tic­i­pat­ed. The ­only exclu­sion guide­lines ­were con­tra­in­di­ca­tions to par­tic­i­pate with­in a max­i­mal ­test, no sub­jects ­were exclud­ed ­upon ­this ­basis. Inter­ven­tions: N/A. Meas­ures: each sub­ject par­tic­i­pat­ed in ­three ­kung fu pro­to­cols (­forms, kick­ing and punch­ing). ­Each pro­to­col, ran­dom­ly allo­cat­ed, con­sist­ed of ten ­work (30 sec) and ten ­rest peri­ods (30 sec). Meas­ures tak­en dur­ing the pro­to­cols ­were ­heart ­rate (HR) and oxy­gen con­sump­tion (V.O2). ­These ­were ­expressed as a per­cent­age of max­i­mal val­ues to ­reflect exer­cise inten­sity.
­Results. Dur­ing ­both the ­form pro­to­col and punch­ing pro­to­col ­group E ­were ­found to be work­ing at a sig­nif­i­cant­ly (p<0.05) low­er %V.O2max ­than ­group N (­forms - ­group E=71.5+5.3, ­group N=82.1±6.1; punch­ing - ­group E=37.5±2.1, ­group N=40.6±2.6, p<0.05). ­This sug­gests ­that expe­ri­enced sub­jects ­were ­more eco­nom­i­cal ­when per­form­ing sim­i­lar move­ment pat­terns.
Con­clu­sions. It was con­clud­ed ­that car­di­o­vas­cu­lar respons­es to ­kung fu tech­niques dif­fer depend­ing ­upon expe­ri­ence lev­el. It is dif­fi­cult to direct­ly ­relate ­this to ­improved econ­o­my ­since ­work out­put ­could not be accu­rate­ly quan­ti­fied. It was ­also ­found ­that ­kung fu pro­to­cols elic­it­ed exer­cise inten­sity ­into the car­di­o­vas­cu­lar train­ing ­zone.

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