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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 1998 December;38(4):281-5

Copyright © 1999 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Effects of ascorbic acid and carbohydrate ingestion on exercise induced oxidative stress

Vasankari T., Kujala U., Sarna S., Ahotupa M.

MCA Research Laboratory and Paavo Nurmi Center, Department of Physiology, University of Turku, Turku; Finnish Sports Institute, Vierumäki, Unit for Sports and Exercise Medicine, Institute of Biomedicine and Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland


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Back­ground. We stud­ied the ­effects of sup­ple­men­ta­tion of vita­min C and car­bo­hy­drate on ­acute exer­cise-­induced lip­id per­ox­i­da­tion.
Meth­ods. Experi­men­tal ­design: two ran­dom­ized con­trolled ­trials.
Par­tic­i­pants: 17 endu­rance ath­letes. Inter­ven­tions: in ­study I, ­nine ath­letes repeat­ed ­twice a 10.5-km max­i­mal run and ingest­ed in a ran­dom­ized sin­gle-­blind ­order ­either 2.0 g vita­min C or pla­ce­bo. In ­study II, ­eight ath­letes repeat­ed ­twice a 27-km max­i­mal run and ingest­ed in ran­dom­ly ­either 105 g car­bo­hy­drate or pla­ce­bo. ­Venous ­blood sam­ples ­were tak­en ­before the exer­cise, imme­di­ate­ly ­after the exer­cise, and ­after a recov­ery peri­od of 90 min (study I) or 120 min (­study II). Meas­ure: ser­um ­diene con­ju­ga­tion, lip­id per­ox­i­da­tion.
­Results. In ­study I, ­there was no dif­fer­ence in ser­um ­diene con­ju­ga­tion ­between the ­trials dur­ing exer­cise (pre- vs ­post-exer­cise). How­ev­er, dur­ing the recov­ery peri­od (­post-exer­cise vs recov­ery sam­ple) ser­um ­diene con­ju­ga­tion con­cen­tra­tion ­decreased by 11% in the vita­min C ­trial but not in pla­ce­bo (p=0.028). In ­study II, ­there was no dif­fer­ence ­between the car­bo­hy­drate and pla­ce­bo ­trials.
Con­clu­sions. Vita­min C and car­bo­hy­drate do not pre­vent exer­cise-­induced ­increase in oxi­da­tive ­stress, but vita­min C, ­being a ­potent aque­ous anti­ox­i­dant, ­seems to ­decrease the lev­els of ­diene con­ju­ga­tion dur­ing recov­ery ­after exer­cise. The clin­i­cal sig­nif­i­cance of ­this phe­nom­e­non ­needs fur­ther eval­u­a­tion.

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