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CASE REPORT   

Journal of Radiological Review 2021 December;8(4):326-9

DOI: 10.23736/S2723-9284.21.00170-8

Copyright © 2021 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome

Annamaria G. NUCERA 1 , Anna FERRARELLI 1, Vittoria LOPEZ 2

1 Unit of Radiology, Department of Advanced Diagnostic-Therapeutic Technologies, Bianchi-Melacrino-Morelli Hospital, Reggio Calabria, Italy; 2 Unit of Radiology, Department of Support Health Services, San Giovanni di Dio Hospital, Crotone, Italy



Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES) results from anomalous relationship between popliteal artery and myofascial structures of the popliteal fossa. This infrequent condition may be congenital or acquired. In the congenital form, one of the calf muscles, most commonly the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle, or the popliteal artery has abnormal anatomical development which results in abnormal position or compression of the popliteal artery. In the acquired form, the hypertrophy of one of the calf muscles, most commonly that of the gastrocnemius muscle, results in compression of the popliteal artery. Whatever the cause, it results in functional occlusion of the popliteal artery with vascular insufficiency. The symptoms usually occur no earlier than 20s and between 20s and 40s likely due to changes related to use of the gastrocnemius muscle in activities such as marching or running causing muscle hypertrophy; furthermore, they most frequently occur in men probably due to the rapid muscle growth that occurs during puberty in this group. The case of unilateral PAES in a 34-year-old man is reported here. CT angiography and MRI showed an abnormal muscle bundle from the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle surrounding the popliteal artery with segmental occlusion and genicular collateral developments in the left lower extremity (Type III).


KEY WORDS: Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome; Computed tomography angiography; Magnetic resonance imaging

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