Home > Journals > Journal of Radiological Review > Past Issues > Il Giornale Italiano di Radiologia Medica 2019 Settembre-Ottobre;6(5) > Il Giornale Italiano di Radiologia Medica 2019 Settembre-Ottobre;6(5):496-9

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as

 

CASE REPORT   

Il Giornale Italiano di Radiologia Medica 2019 Settembre-Ottobre;6(5):496-9

DOI: 10.23736/S2283-8376.19.00223-7

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English, Italian

Duodenocaval fistula after external beam radiotherapy of a retroperitoneal metastatic uterine cancer

Nicola CAMISASSI 1 , Umberto G. ROSSI 2, Alessandro VALDATA 2, Francesco PINNA 2, Pierluca TORCIA 3, Maurizio CARIATI 3

1 School of Radiodiagnostics, San Martino University Hospital IRCCS, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy; 2 Unit of Interventional Radiology, Galliera Hospital, Genoa, Italy; 3 Unit of Interventional and Diagnostics Radiology, Department of Advanced Therapeutic Diagnostic Technologies, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Milan, Italy


PDF


Duodenocaval fistula (DCF) is an uncommon but highly lethal entity. DCF are most commonly seen in men with an average age of 50 years and the mortality rate approaches 40%. DCF typically arises as a complication from migrating inferior vena cava filters, peptic ulcer disease related to retroperitoneal tumor resection in association with radiation therapy, or transmural migration of ingested foreign bodies. The most common presentations of DCF are sepsis and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The high mortality has been attributed to the difficulty of diagnosis before attempts at definitive therapy. Computed tomography provides noninvasive evaluation of the inferior vena cava and the adjacent structures and it can correctly identify DCF in approximately 83% of patients. We present a case of DCF occurring 6 months after external beam radiotherapy of a retroperitoneal metastatic uterine cancer.


KEY WORDS: Fistula; Radiotherapy; Tomography, X-ray computed; Uterine neoplasms

top of page