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Il Giornale Italiano di Radiologia Medica 2018 Settembre-Ottobre;5(5):660-5

DOI: 10.23736/S2283-8376.18.00112-2

Copyright © 2018 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: Italian

Extended paraganglioma of the glomus tympanicum in a 55-year-old man

Giovanni B. VERRONE 1 , Michele PIETRAGALLA 1, Diletta COZZI 1, Cosimo NARDI 1, Francesco MUNGAI 2, Luigi BONASERA 2, Vittorio MIELE 2

1 Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Istituto di Radiologia dell’Università, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Firenze, Italia; 2 Struttura Operativa Dipartimentale di Radiodiagnostica di Emergenza-Urgenza, Dipartimento dei Servizi, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Firenze, Italia


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Paragangliomas are hypervascularized tumors that originate from receptors of neuroectodermal derivation (paragangli) present throughout the body near the large vessels. In the head-neck district they account for 0.5% of all tumors: in most cases they are single and occur sporadically, but in 40% of cases they represent one of the clinical manifestations of genetically determined syndromes. Paragangliomas of the head-neck district are generally non-secretory with a low probability of malignant transformation and are located near the carotid bifurcation, along the course of the vagus nerve near the nodose ganglion, in the jugular foramen and temporal bone. The main clinical symptoms of glomus tympanicum paraganglioma are conductive hearing loss, pulsatile tinnitus and, more rarely, facial paralysis, but they can also be asymptomatic. Diagnostic imaging is essential in establishing the hypervascular nature of these lesions, the relationships with the structures of the ear and of the skull base and for the therapeutic planning. We describe a case of extended glomus tympanicum paraganglioma in a 55-year-old man who had reported left hearing loss for some months and a recent episode of ipsilateral ear bleeding.


KEY WORDS: Head and neck neoplasms - Paraganglioma - Glomus tympanicum tumor - Magnetic resonance angiography

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