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Panminerva Medica 2021 Apr 20

DOI: 10.23736/S0031-0808.21.04268-3

Copyright © 2021 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Diet as a tool for primordial cardiovascular prevention in developing countries

Khawer N. SIDDIQUI

Department of Cardiology, Ruby General Hospital, Kolkata, India


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There is a rising burden of Non-communicable disease (NCD), especially cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in the developing nations to an extent that they are sometimes terms as NCD epidemics. If unchecked, these NCD epidemics, can impact the healthcare systems and adversely affect the development of the whole country. While CVD is a matter of concern worldwide, it is even more so in low- and middle-income countries, where the incidence and prevalence of these diseases are much worse than developed countries, owning to their large population. As per WHO estimates, CVDs cause 28.5% of all deaths, in the developing nations. Even within the developing countries, the profile of CVD varies greatly, depending on the phase of epidemiological transition the country is currently undergoing. While primary prevention is about treating risk factors to prevent CVD, primordial prevention refers to avoiding the development of risk factors in the first place. As we now know, atherosclerosis starts in youth and is related to dyslipidemia, smoking, and hypertension, body mass index and blood glucose levels. Therefore, the primordial prevention must start early in life. High-quality clinical trials have traditionally been mainly focusing on primary and secondary prevention settings. There are some key studies that evaluated the role of diet in Primordial setting, which are discussed in this review.


KEY WORDS: Cardiovascular diseases; CVD; DALY; Primordial; Primary prevention; Developing country

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