Home > Journals > Panminerva Medica > Past Issues > Articles online first > Panminerva Medica 2020 Apr 23

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe PROMO
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as

 

 

Panminerva Medica 2020 Apr 23

DOI: 10.23736/S0031-0808.20.03904-X

Copyright © 2020 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Beyond the growth delay in children with sleep-related breathing disorders: a systematic review

Marco ZAFFANELLO 1 , Giorgio PIACENTINI 1, Stefania LA GRUTTA 2

1 Department of Surgical Sciences, Dentistry, Gynecology and Pediatrics, University of Verona, Verona, Italy; 2 National Research Council of Italy, Institute for Research and Biomedical Innovation, Palermo, Italy


PDF


INTRODUCTION: The availability of high-quality studies on the association between sleep-disordered breathing in children and delayed growth associated with the hormonal profile recorded before surgery and at follow-up is limited.
EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: Medline PubMed, Scopus and WebOfScience databases were searched for relevant publications published between January 2008 to January 2020 and a total of 261 potentially eligible studies were identified.
EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: Following review 19 papers were eligible for inclusion: seven reported a significant post- surgical increase in growth regardless of initial weight status, type of surgery, type of study design, and length of follow-up period. The only high-quality study was a randomized controlled trial that found an increased risk of OSAS relapse in overweight children. Twelve studies reported the significant increase in growth parameters showing that IGF-1, IGFBP-3, and ghrelin may boost growth after surgery.
CONCLUSIONS: The current systematic review demonstrates a scarcity of high quality studies on growth delay in children with sleep-disordered breathing. Significant catch-up growth after surgery in the short term and changes in IGF-1, IGFBP-3, ghrelin, and leptin levels has been reported in most published studies.


KEY WORDS: Adenotonsillar hypertrophy; Adenotonsillectomy; Failure to thrive; Growth delay; Biochemical marker; Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome; Sleep-disordered breathing

top of page